Categories
Magic Performing Arts Variety Arts Vaudevisuals Interview

Tribute to Bradley Fields – Magician, director, and mime.

BRADLEY FIELDS

I had known Bradley for many years. Ever since he returned from his studies with master mime Etienne Decroux in Paris. We stayed in touch and spoke on the phone periodically during the last few years. He was living near Washington DC. I was producing/shooting some video interviews for my blog post on Jack Adams. Bradley was in NY visiting the APAP conference and came over for the interviews that are posted here.

A wonderful person and charming performer. R.I.P. Bradley Fields.


. Bradley as the ‘barker’ in the Broadway show ‘Barnum’ that Opened in 1980.


Bradley spent a few years as an assistant to magician Jack Adams. Here is an interview I did with Bradley about his time with Jack.


Bradley Fields at the APAP convention promoting all his shows. 





This is a link to Bradley Fields website!

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Categories
Performing Arts Photography Variety Arts Video Women

Vince Bruce – Trick Roper – A Tribute

Tribute Video for Vince Bruce.

Vince Bruce ©2019 by Dutch photographer Kees Tabak

At eight years old Vince Bruce met early Wild West cowboy star and music hall performer, Tex McLeod who lived down the street from him in England. Inspired then to be a rope twirling cowboy like his hero, Vince practiced rope tricks under the tutelage of his inventor father. By the age of twelve, he had a regular Friday night spot at a local holiday resort.

As a teenager in the traveling circuses of Europe and later in cabaret clubs and theatre festivals around the world, Vince developed his natural style as an entertainer with unparalleled ability as a western arts virtuoso.

Vince first came to the States in 1983 as the half-time act for the Harlem Globetrotters and that same year won every award at the first convention of the International Trick & Fancy Ropers Association.

In 1991 he starred in the Broadway hit “The Will Rogers’ Follies” where he created the role of “The Roper,” portraying Will Rogers on the silver screen of Hollywood. The show ran two and a half years and received seven Tony’s.

While in New York, Vince met his wife Annie Dubats, a singer prominent in Manhattan’s downtown art and music scene. When working together, Annie graces Vince’s act by singing a few of her own songs and some country classics while on horseback.

Vince’s show is unique. I mean, how many British Cowboys do you know? He looks like the quintessential cowboy — tall and slim with a lined, character face. He’s a blast of energy when he comes on stage swinging a lasso in a big circle that spins wildly over the heads of a surprised audience, while the little bits of “business” that he puts into his roping routines make whatever he’s doing irresistibly entertaining.

(Courtesy of Margo Feiden Gallery)

Here is Vince Bruce performing his act on the English TV Paul Daniels Show

Vince Bruce, born April 4, 1955, died September 24, 2011.

Here is a lovely obit from the UK paper The Telegraph

For more information visit his website here!

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A Tribute by A.J. Silver

There are very few people in history who have earned the title “ The Greatest”.
Vince Bruce the greatest western performer to ever live is one of them.
   Vince is also known as the Wizard of Whips and Ropes performed in the most prestigious entertainment venues around the world including Broadway,  Carnegie Hall and a regular performer at The Tiger Palast in Frankfurt, Germany.
  His western act including trick roping and whips but what set him apart was his unmatched skill level and artistry.
He was a true artist!
    Most roping acts were based on technical skills.
Rope spinners would perform their tricks with music playing in the background and often it was somewhat boring.
 Vince took the western act and showed the world how exciting it could be combining his skills with comedy and showmanship.
His act was perfectly timed to the music and the audiences knew they were watching a virtuoso.
Vince also included unicycle skills and performed the famous Bobby May trick in his act.
 The Bobby May trick involved throwing a lit match behind his back and catching it in his mouth followed by throwing a cigarette behind his back and catching it in his mouth and lighting it with the match, he would then cut the lit cigarette out of his mouth with his whip. This trick earned the respect from jugglers and circus legends and  It made him more than a western act, he was a variety superstar.
  Vince’s act had such a high skill level that unless you understood roping you could never fathom that he was performing so many risky feats that a mistake could happen any second. To perform an act at this level requires exceptional confidence and focus and countess hours of daily practice.
  When talking to variety artists who do not understand roping I call Vince the Francis Brunn of ropers. 
Just like there will never be a juggler who can be compared to Francis,  there will never be another roper who can be compared to Vince.
They are both legends who took their art form to another level with original technical skill and artistry.
They truly are kings of their disciplines and have inspired countless performers. 
I imagine every western performer alive today considers Vince Bruce their idol.
  Vince traveled the world performing in the most prestigious stage productions and circuses and then he created a unique rodeo act with his performing partner and wife Annie Dubats.
  Annie met Vince while he was starring in the Big Apple Circus in NYC.
Annie had a career as a singer and grew up working with horses.
They complimented each other and Annie made it possible for Vince to create the act he always dreamed of, spinning a big loop around two horses while standing on them and racing around the arena at a full gallop. 
  Annie and Vince also created an original horse catching/roping act that had all but disappeared from the rodeo.
Annie would sing on horseback, not an easy feat while Vince would perform Mexican style roping while seated and standing on his horse. Annie would then gallop past Vince’s horse and the timing had to be perfect as Vince would roll his loop out and catch Annie and her horse.
 This act would not have been possible without Annie. There is so much preparation that goes into training and maintaining an act like this.
  In the past, Vince could hop on a plane with his luggage but now there were two horses that had to be transported and cared for.
Annie made it possible for Vince to maintain his skill level by sharing the responsibility of exercising, training and caring for their two horses Cochise and Comanche.
Annie and Vince made a perfect team and to see them perform together with their horses was witnessing a lifelong dream come true.

We lost Vince to cancer in 2011.
   He had a great sense of humor and a big heart.
Vince had a huge amount of love for the world and he was generous with it.
He always gave encouragement to fellow ropers and would always offer help. It was hard not to love him back.
 I started my career as a rodeo trick rider and always thought trick roping was boring until the day I saw Vince perform.
My mind was blown! I couldn’t believe what I just saw. I was actually angry that I could not imagine how beautiful and exciting a western act could be. 
 I owe a great deal to Vince. It was because of him that I decided to create a roping act.
I always enjoy my talks with Annie who I consider almost like a sister.
Annie is one of the few people I know who understands the whole gamut of Show Business – Broadway, Circus, Stage productions, Rodeo, Wild West Shows. Horse Spectacles ………
 Annie saw the world with Vince and has such a vast knowledge of not only Show business but what went into creating and maintaining Vince’s act.
 There are very few days that go by that I don’t wonder how Vince was able to accomplish the high skill level and artistry of his act and  It truly boggles my mind.
He was Superhuman, peerless and he will always be unmatched – The Greatest.


Spinning a big loop around two horses while standing on them and racing around the arena at a full gallop. Colorado Springs Rodeo

Special THANKS goes out to Joan Henry Houghton (Mutts Gone Nuts), A.J. Silver, Margareta Dillinger (Tiger Palast) and Annie Dubats (Vince Bruce’s wife).

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Categories
Clown Comedy Photography

“A Clown in Our Town” – A Tribute to Rob Torres

A Clown in Our Town –  A Tribute to Rob Torres

DONATE HERE!


Rob Torres was one of the funniest and most professional clowns in the world. Having performed in over 80 countries throughout his life, he brought laughter to thousands if not millions of people creating a fan base that was truly world-wide.

Tragically in late June, Rob suddenly passed away of a heart attack while flying to his engagement in Boston, Massachusetts.

Rob and I were working on a book project tentatively titled “A Clown in Our Town” which included photographs of Rob in many of the cities where he performed using iconic geographical locations to showcase his clown character in that particular town.  We shot in Paris (Cirque d’Hiver), St. Louis (Circus Flora) and New York (Big Apple Circus)  and had plans to shoot in 6 other cities during his upcoming tours.

While planning this tribute book, I realized that Rob had been captured by many other wonderful photographers.  I reached out to a number of my colleagues who had also had the pleasure and opportunity of capturing Rob performing.  I am fortunate to have Maike Schulz, Michelle Bates and a few others (names will be announced at a later date) share their own vision through photographs of Rob performing in different venues.  Their work will contribute to the second part of the book. I have also contacted his family to contribute photographs of Rob in his early years.

Rob Torres performing at Moisture Fest in Seattle – ©2018 Michelle Bates

To produce this tribute, funds are needed for graphic design work and publishing. I encourage you to share Rob’s vision and help make this book a wonderful TRIBUTE to Rob Torres – anybody who ever met him or saw him perform knows how much he truly deserves it.

Rob Torres rehearsing for the Big Apple Circus in NY – ©2018 Maike Schulz

Hardcover book featuring approx. 30+ pages of Color/B&W photographs.

Unique and unrepeatable first edition.

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~ Pledge $75 – 2 copies of the book and a Special Thank You in the book.

~ Pledge $50 – one copy of the book and a Thank You in the book.

~ Pledge $10 – a postcard featuring one of the photographs from the book and a Thank You.
~ Pledge $5 – a Social Media shout out from the photographers in the book.
~ Make a pledge without a reward. Any amount is appreciated!

Estimated delivery date: March 31, 2019
~ So please, give what you can, tell who you can, and let’s start this journey together. ~

DONATE HERE!

All funds that are donated which exceed the printing/designing costs will be forwarded to the Estudio Búsqueda de Panotmima-Teatro/The Rob Torres Memorial and Scholarship Fund.

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Who is Rob Torres? For those of you that aren’t familiar with this brilliant clown I would like to present a wonderful documentary by Sebastiano Greco and Luigi Marmo. (Thank You Sebastiano and Luigi!)

A Moving Portrait – Rob Torres

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Categories
Music Women

Aretha Franklin – A Tribute

A rare 1968 concert in Amsterdam with Aretha Franklin. Amazing!

Orchestra and The Sweet Inspirations. Preshow backstage preparation.

60 Minutes interview with Aretha Franklin in 1990.

Recent tribute on Stephen Colbert show featuring her performance at The Kennedy Center

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From: Jazz Times

Aretha Franklin, an internationally renowned vocalist who was known as “The Queen of Soul” but also explored jazz and Tin Pan Alley standards among other genres during her nearly 60-year career, died at 9:50 a.m. on August 16 at her home in Detroit, Mich., after a long battle with pancreatic cancer. She was 76 years old.

Her death was confirmed in a statement released August 16 by her family, which read in part, “We have lost the matriarch and rock of our family.”

Franklin had one of the most storied and successful popular music careers in the post-World War II era. Among her accomplishments, she was the most frequently charted artist in the history of the Billboard music chart, with 112 hit singles, 17 of them in the pop top 10, and 20 No. 1 R&B singles. She also won 18 Grammy Awards, was elected to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987, and in 1994, at 52, became the youngest person ever to receive a Kennedy Center Honor.

However, she remained best known for her first No. 1 pop hit, 1967’s “Respect,” which became both her signature song and an anthem of the civil rights and feminist movements in the United States. Other classic recordings included “Chain of Fools,” “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman,” “Think” and “Sisters Are Doin’ It for Themselves,” as well as albums like 1967’s I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You, 1968’s Lady Soul, and 1985’s Who’s Zoomin’ Who.

Aretha Louise Franklin was born on March 25, 1942 in Memphis, Tenn., at her parents’ home at 406 Lucy Avenue. Her mother, Barbara, was a singer and pianist; her father, Reverend Clarence LaVaughn “C.L.” Franklin was a Baptist minister. After a brief stay in Buffalo, N.Y., the family moved to Detroit when Aretha was five years old, although her parents separated the following year, with her mother returning to Buffalo before passing away in 1952.

The famed gospel singer Mahalia Jackson became a surrogate mother to young Aretha, helping to take care of her and her three siblings. During her childhood, her father also gained celebrity status with his fiery sermon style, becoming an in-demand visiting preacher and a national radio personality. Aretha became prominent at Rev. Franklin’s church as a solo gospel singer and pianist; she later joined him on his sermon tours. She dropped out of high school in her sophomore year to sign a recording contract with Detroit’s J.V.B. Records and continue touring with her father (who became her manager). At 16, she joined Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on one of his speaking tours.

Idolizing Sam Cooke, the gospel-turned-soul singer whom she had met on the preaching circuit, Franklin decided to emulate his crossover success in popular music. Legendary talent scout John Hammond signed her to Columbia Records in 1960. Her first album, 1961’s Aretha, paired her with jazz pianist Ray Bryant and his band, and won her that year’s “Rising Star Vocalist” award from DownBeatmagazine.

Eight more albums followed for Columbia from 1961 to 1966. The recordings found her undertaking a mix of pop, jazz, and R&B songs that ranged from standards like “Over the Rainbow” and “Exactly Like You” to Billie Holiday’s “God Bless the Child” and the repertoire of Dinah Washington, to whom Franklin paid tribute on the 1964 LP Unforgettable.

She was a modest success, with a few songs making the R&B and jazz charts, although her gospel-based vocal style was often at odds with the attenuated pop-based material she was given at Columbia. In late 1966, she left the label and signed to Atlantic Records, which proved to be the turning point in her career. Atlantic sent her to record at the acclaimed soul-music FAME studios in Muscle Shoals, Ala., where she began what would become I Never Loved a Man the Way I Loved You. The title track and “Respect” were released as singles, and they made Franklin an international superstar.

Her success continued unabated, with several more hits in 1967 and 1968; she sang at Dr. Martin Luther King’s funeral in April 1968, and two months later appeared on the cover of Time magazine. By the end of the decade she had gained the nickname “Queen of Soul.” She maintained her stardom into the 1970s, with top-10 singles including “Rock Steady” and the acclaimed live album Aretha Live at the Fillmore West. However, her record sales began to slump in the latter part of the decade.

Franklin made a comeback in 1985 with the platinum-selling Arista album Who’s Zoomin’ Who?, including the hits “Freeway of Love” and the title track. By that time, Franklin had assumed iconic cultural status in America, a regular concert sellout, although hit records became fewer and farther between; her last top-40 hit was the Lauryn Hill-penned “A Rose Is Still a Rose,” in 1998. She gained popular attention, however, singing “The Star-Spangled Banner” at Superbowl XL in 2006, and “My Country ’Tis of Thee” at the 2009 presidential inauguration of Barack Obama.

Long after she had become a popular success, Franklin continued to maintain a foothold in the jazz world; she appeared occasionally at the galas surrounding the Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition, and at the 2016 International Jazz Day concert at the White House in Washington, D.C.

Franklin had long struggled with poor health, having surgery to remove a tumor in 2010 and canceling several shows and tours in the following years due to ongoing medical treatments that she chose to keep private. Her final performance was in November 2017, when she appeared at an Elton John AIDS Foundation event in New York. Earlier this year, Franklin announced that she would cease touring to focus on her health.

Franklin is survived by a half-sister, Carl Jennings Kelley, and four sons: Clarence Franklin, Edward Franklin, Ted White Jr., and Kecalf Cunningham. She was predeceased by two sisters, Carolyn and Erma Franklin, a brother, Cecil Franklin, and a half-brother, Vaughn Franklin.

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Categories
Clown Comedy Commedia dell' Arte Mask Performing Arts Photography Physical Theater Story Teller Vaudevisuals Interview Video

Tribute to Carlo Mazzone-Clementi

CARLO MAZZONE-CLEMENTI

I have to admit I don’t remember when I met Carlo but it was before 1983. That was the year I convinced him to visit my studio to do some photographs. He was playful and not too prepared. He came with a couple of great Commedia masks and found objects in the studio to improvise with for the camera. It was great fun! I have decided to make this tribute since many movement-based performers don’t know about Carlo. I contacted a few friends that knew him well ask them to contribute to this post. They knew him better and have stories to tell!

From Wikipedia: Carlo Mazzone-Clementi (12 December 1920 – 5 November 2000) was a performer and founder of two schools of Commedia, mime and physical theater as well as a contemporary and colleague of leaders of the modern European theater. From his arrival in the USA in 1957, he was largely responsible for the spreading of commedia dell’arte in North America. He first gained attention in Italy in 1947 alongside Marcel Marceau in the mime’s first tour outside of Paris. From 1948 to 1951, he assisted Jacques Lecoq, while Lecoq taught and directed the Players of Padua University. In 1954, Mazzone-Clementi was at Piccolo Teatro di Milano with Dario Fo and Franca Rame. Click here for more information from their post about Carlo.

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Interview with Hovey Burgess

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Driving with Carlo Mazzone-Clementi

By: Stanley Allan Sherman

The Mid Atlantic Movement Theater Festival, January 2000, packed with various performers, vaudevillians and theater artists taking classes, teaching, performing and networking at a large motel in Maryland. Festival organizers approached me asking if I would make an important announcement.   Everyone was called into the main room, “We have some very sad news.” Participants started shouting about the 2000 Presidential election recount tragedy going on at the time. “No, it is not about the election. Carlo Mazzone-Clementi has died”.

 Arriving in the United States – October 4th, 1957 the world was shocked by Sputnik, the first satellite which was launched by Russia. That is also when Carlo came to New York, NY by ship. This I found out from Carlo’s son Val. Carlo was warming up for a show, “Cock-a-Doodle Dandy”.   On the NY City Opera stage Carlo, jumping up and down like a rooster. The floor happened to be weak where he was jumping, suddenly boom! Carlo went flying through the stage floor landing in the basement and permanently injuring his knees. The result of this injury Carlo said, “I guess I teach”.

The First Time I saw Carlo – About 1977 Carlo Mazzone-Clementi performing at West Beth Theater Center, New York NY in the old Bell Laboratory main room with the insanely tall ceiling. It’s where the first television was turned on with Thomas Edison.   An extremely high scaffolding happened to be up in the room, 3 to 5 levels high. Carlo entered, sweeping across the stage with a push broom. Looking at the scaffolding rising to the high ceiling, he started climbing it slowly, hanging off different parts with unique various actions on each of the levels. Arriving at the top, tossing something off into the house. Beautiful. It was simple and inspiring. Seemed like nothing was planned, everything was done improviso. But it was planned like a Commedia dell’Arte scenario. About this time one of my mentors, actor, director, producer and writer, Vasek Simek builder of the Perry Street Theater challenged me to make a leather Commedia dell’Arte mask. Over the next year, I discovered the beginning skills of leather mask making.

Carlo’s Tragedies – It is hard to talk about the great Carlo Mazzone-Clementi without speaking about the various tragedies that struck Carlo several times. Tragedies in his life affected his fate. These tragedies would make life hard for him, but affect other people’s lives in positive ways. Injury to his knees twice, early in his performing career. The theft of his tools and in Carlo’s words, “my school”, resulting in stealing opportunities for Carlo to share his knowledge, wisdom and vast numbers of exercises. Tragic events would force Carlo to create new opportunities in the United States and in other parts of the world, having positive effects on others. Like Copenhagen, Denmark with Ole Brekke creating The Commedia School http://commediaschool.com .

Carlo’s Beloved Masks – Berkeley California, Carlo visiting friends at a school in Berkeley California and had all of this masks and props with him in an old trunk tied to the top of his Volvo. Coming out of the school to his Volvo his trunk was gone. The tie ropes holding Carlo’s trunk were cut. All of his Commedia dell’Arte masks and special props – gone. For Carlo, this was a devastating blow. These beloved tools where taken from him along with part of his life and livelihood. It is likely the people that took Carlos trunk have no idea the value of what they have.

Carlo the Odd Fellows Hall and his school – His stolen Commedia dell’Arte masks would lead me to work with Carlo at his school he created in the middle of nowhere in Northern California. There was cow pastures, two bars, loggers, a coffee shop, a small post office, maybe a beauty parlor and a small store. Peter Kors was one person he asked to join him in 1972. Carlo came up to Peter and said, “I just bought the Odd Fellows Hall in the mountains, come we start a school.” The big red building in Blue Lake was the largest in this small town, an enormous building. This was his base where Carlo did all of his work and return to after various teaching gigs around the world.

Coming to work with Carlo – Hearing from a few people there was a performer who trained at Ecole Jacques Lecoq, making leather masks in NYC, Carlo invited me to his school to replace his set of Commedia dell’Arte masks and teach. I had been working with leather for about 1 year has made a small number of leather masks in between performing shows several times a week, on the street, in theaters and various venues.   In 1979, seven years after graduating from Ecole Jacques Lecoq I went to make masks and teach with Carlo.   There were some very odd goings on at the school that I did not understand, they would become clear a few years later.

Spiritual moments with Carlo – Carlo gave me a room facing the street with a big window for the mask studio. Carlo would often come down to the studio late at night and say, “Stanley you work too hard, come we drink wine.” This happened almost every night. Would stop sculpting and cover things up. We would climb up to the upper unused studio on the top floor, it felt like Carlo’s hideaway. From a secret hidden place, Carlo would pull out a Gallon jug of Gallo wine and two glassing filling them; smile and laugh. We would drink and talk. “What do you Jews do on Friday night?   Every Friday night you get together, stop relax and drink wine! Why?” It is funny; not until writing this do I realize Carlo’s great influence on me in keeping the Jewish Sabbath and drinking wine with friends on Friday night. This is often how our conversation would start and it would go on for hours. Talking about fate, faith, trust, history, and destiny.   World War II and how he escaped capture from the Nazi’s. Carlo considered himself the Commedia dell’Arte character Brighella. In some ways he was a Dottore, knowing Italian, French, Latin, English and able to juggle them all. Looking at some of Carlo’s writings he was always playing with words and loved them. Art, theater, performing is a spiritual force – which also relates to Carlo’s Metaphysical Mask which more people are seeing its value.

Riding with Carlo Driving – Experiencing riding in the car with Carlo driving is one of the best examples of Carlo’s philosophy on life and theater. All the other teachers told me, “Never ride with Carlo driving!” Riding in a car with Carlo driving is an experience one never forgets. We are driving through weaving mountain passes with lots of blind turns and twists. Most likely an old paved logging road. Carlo would always take the shortest route between two points. This meant driving across the road, driving on the wrong side of the road against traffic around blind turns. I freaked out!   After we got passed the blind turn and we were driving on the correct side of the road, only because it was the shortest route between two points Carlo would say, “You see Stanley, nothing to worry about! We are here.” It was about trusting fate and knowing nothing bad was going to happen to you.   Knowing that you can go around a blind curve and you can deal with anything that is there. Yes of course, once in a while we would come onto an oncoming car or truck at high speed and Carlo would just gently, slightly alter his course while the other car was freaking out, swerving and honking. “You see Stanley everyone is fine! Do not worry so much. Why should I take the long way, this is direct.” The really scary thing is after a while I trusted riding with Carlo.

This knowledge and understanding, that trust relates to one of Carlo’s powerful exercises, that I use all the time. Closing your eyes, then running full tilt to an object on the floor, stopping and hitting your hand on the object. If you hit the object, with your eyes closed you get to move onto the next object. You go directly to the object knowing you will hit it. Being able to stop is very important, with both Jacques Lecoq and Carlo. Being able to run and then stopping on a point is vital.

In theater, it is easy to be too safe. In theater, you must be able to go around blind curves. It is far more exciting theatrically. Can it also kill you? Of course, it can. But when it is your time, it is your time. This was part of Carlo’s thinking. Not being captured or escaping the Nazi’s in WWII helped influence his philosophy.   With Carlo it is about the joy, being in the moment, now – improveaso –meaning improvising within the moment. It is what the neutral mask is all about. Being totally in the moment. Peter Kors explained to me during our Metaphysical Mask Lab in NYC. The first one in the USA since most likely the 70’s, something very important which helps understand Carlo’s thinking. Carlo would say, “It is not about being. It’s about becoming. Great theater is about becoming. You are always in this state of becoming. Being is stagnant. Becoming is active. Like the trapeze artist from the moment he lets go of the first trapeze to when he touches the second trapeze.” Being close to the ground, becoming one with the ground. Trusting yourself.   But with Carlo, it is beyond being in the moment. He wants you to be going beyond the moment to a constant stage of becoming.

Carlo and his character_ Brighella, Arlecchino or Dottore
Carlo considered himself Brighella; however, in my opinion, his true love of etymology makes him a bit of a Dottore as well. He was a person that could play with words and word games within several languages, including Italian, French, English, and of course, Latin. Reading a few pages of his personal notes, he writes in all four languages because he most likely thought in all four. This is why it was hard for some to understand him.   Some people looked at Carlo in his life as Arlecchino. One of Jacques Lecoq’s definitions of Arlecchino was, “a 50-year-old child that never grows up”, this was also Carlo, as he was always ready to play.

Carlo had many sayings, some he might only say once in a situation. Some of his known favorites:

“The Earth is your friend.”

“The Earth is your friend, my friend.”

“Character starts in the foot.”

“Effort, Momentum, Risk and Joy.” The four elements as a creator in the theater you must have.

“This is what you think with (hitting both hands on his ass) this is what you shit with (hitting both hands on his head), this is the principle of Commedia dell’Arte.”

Carlo still lives.

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Carlo Mazzone-Clementi

BY Lou Campbell Ph. D.

Derived from his text Mime and Pantomime in the Twentieth Century,  – Published by Edwin Mellen Press, Lewiston, N.Y. 2008

An area which is commonly associated with the history of mime is Commedia Dell’ Arte. Carlo Mazzone-Clementi, Italian born and reared in Padua, learned mime in the traditions of Commedia from his grandfather who “was the natural born Commedia specialist. My grandfather gave me a lot of identity consciousness and understanding.” Others who influenced Carlo Mazzone-Clementi in his technical growth were Marceau in 1947 when he visited Padua in search of Commedia and LeCoq in 1948 who came to Italy to research the natural movement of the Italian people.

Mazzone-Clementi’s contemporary definition of Commedia Dell’ Arte seems to provide a significant reason for the apparent growth and interest in the form during the last two decades. Mazzone-Clementi suggests that the phenomenon of the Renaissance is again reviving because people of our age are seeking personal identity as well as challenging conventional theatre forms.

It is man’s representation of rebirth on the stage about anything that you can say is happening in life; finally representing everybody, but most capably represented by the soloist who can play ensemble and concerto, and by the virtuoso who can play the mountebank and the silent one.

Inherent in this definition is the prerequisite for depth, technical training, intense observation of human nature, and appropriate translation into meaningful human experiences on stage – all the requirements of a good actor.

Carlo Mazzone-Clementi identifies the hardest thing for contemporary students to grasp “is that you don’t say Commedia; you mean Commedia. It is the harmonization of a bit to a situation.” This definition presupposes that Commedia can be applied to any theatrical situation and that a certain objective displacement is necessary in order for the performer to both assess the situation on stage and place himself into it with the appropriate character context. It further necessitates a high degree of technical skill to the extent that the performer is capable of recalling those resources instantaneously on stage.

The mime inherently neutralizes his character, both through the use of the mask and through universal gesturing. Mazzone-Clementi approaches performance as the bridge between the actor and the mime. “Philologically I know what character means, but I use the term ‘personality character.’ It is a physical internalization. I cannot be a character; rather, I have to be the character.” The mask becomes the ultimate physical comment on the character, not the point of initiation of character. The mask should not conceal the actor’s identity but should reflect.

The similarity of activity in style mime and Commedia is unmistakable. The major distinction is Commedia’s spontaneity with the usage of mime techniques. “One cannot be a jazz musician if he doesn’t know where the bit is and if he doesn’t have the technical ability to resolve it.” Mime technique corroborates movement skills when the spontaneity becomes inherent in the activity.

From the Grand Comedy Festival at Qual-a-wa-loo, Mazzone-Clementi’s work centers around his school, which was begun in 1975. The curriculum includes training in basic acting, philosophy, and techniques of Commedia, acrobatics, mime, clowning, and guest instructors with particular expertise to complement the program. The reason for the school is to regenerate meaningful Commedia in the Twentieth Century. “Usually people use Commedia for obscenity (low comic laughs) in production but I see it as the central focus of the production.”

The essential reason for contemporary Commedia lies in the demand for more than conventional theatre. Many unconventional theatrical experiences are inflammatory attempts to communicate, whether it is social, political or instructive. “The purpose of playing is the need to communicate. As a performer or a commedia, I would invent something that would be a mirage, a reflection, and a respondent.” This aspect seems central to the pervading philosophy of mime as it is emerging along with the contemporary Commedia.

The capacity for improvisation is based in this instance on a high degree of technical skill and training. But along the same lines, spontaneity and improvisation can be employed by the unskilled and untrained for different purposes and with different results, just as theatre games can be used in psychological therapy.

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It seems that I have been collecting information and comments since 2011. Here is John Towsen’s contribution dated August 2011. From his wonderful blog:

ALL FALL DOWN – The Craft & Art of Physical Comedy

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“Commedia & the Actor” by Carlo Mazzone-Clementi

I once heard Avner “the Eccentric” Eisenberg dedicate his show “to Jacques Lecoq, who taught me everything I know, and to Carlo Mazzone-Clementi, who taught me everything else.”

This was a compliment, not a putdown, for Carlo’s specialty was not so much commedia technique as it was the zen of just being there, “being available.” When he did perform, he apparently planned nothing, content to just play with masks and props.  This annoyed some, inspired others.  His favorite exercise the summer I was at Dell’Arte was The Maze:  blindfolded, you’d walk a winding path bordered by piles of junk while reciting a nursery rhyme or singing a song.  Touch anything before reaching the goal and you had to go back and start over. The point, of course, was not so much getting good enough to ever make it to the other side (few did), but rather savoring the innate comedy and body language of our inevitable failure.

It may be a cliché to talk about exploring “the child within us all,” but that was certainly part of Carlo’s persona. I remember a 4th of July party at our clown loft on Chambers Street in NYC, 1981 or thereabouts, with Carlo in attendance. Like a naughty kid, Carlo had gotten hold of a sizable stash of illegal fireworks and was up and down the street setting them off, on and around parked cars, coming close to blowing up the neighborhood and raining police down on us. We literally had to send out a posse to corral him.  He was over 60 at the time.

My earliest encounter with Carlo, years before I studied with him, had been over the phone and through the mail, as I first solicited him for the article you see below, and then worked with him on it as its editor. It was 1973 and my NYU grad school work-study job was as an assistant editor at The Drama Review (TDR). With Brooks McNamara, I was putting together an ambitious issue devoted to popular entertainments, a subject that editor Michael Kirby had open disdain for. While Marvin Carlson’s historical article on the Boulevard de Crime (see post 162) was deemed acceptable, Carlo’s more fanciful effort —”who has more to say to us than the zannies?” — was to Kirby just a bunch of hippie crap. Eventually, we got the piece into solid shape and I think it holds up well today as an introduction to and rationale for a physical approach to acting.

Commedia and the Actor by Carlo Mazzone Clementi

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Here is a link to the ‘talk’ given in July of 2015 by Joan Schirle. Or here!

Broadcast from Dell’Arte International’s Carlo Theatre in Blue Lake California as part of Dell’Arte International’s 40th reunion—a celebration of 40 years of artistic creation, collaboration, community engagement, and actor-training.

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Categories
Comedy Magic Performing Arts Photography Sideshow Story Teller Video Women

Tribute to Johnny Fox – Feb 1st @The Slipper Room

 

JOHNNY FOX

11/13/53 – 12/17/17 R.I.P.

A Master Sword Swallower/Magician/Street Performer/Busker/Person

The Slipper Room was set up with a lovely projection of Johnny Fox and one lit candle.

Slipper Room’s James Habacker set the mood for the evening with a story of his first meeting with Johnny Fox.

Thomas M. Cote

Joe Coleman

Lady Aye

Tomas Kubinek

Jelly Boy the Clown

Toby Logue

Adam Cardone

Terre Roche, formerly of the band The Roches.

Thanks to Norman Blake for supplying these wonderful photographs

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~And here is the video excerpt from that night’s speakers~

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And here are some videos of Johnny Fox!

CLICK HERE TO VISIT THE FRREAKATORIUM

Disclaimer: If anyone present at this event is not mentioned here I apologize as I didn’t know everyone!

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