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“Ask Hovey” ~ A talk about midgets featuring Rose’s Royal Midgets book.

On Monday night I watched the wonderful Bindlestiff Open Stage Quarantine edition and was pleased to see the “Ask Hovey” segment (featuring circus historian/teacher/performer Hovey Burgess) where he talked about ‘Midgets’ and mentioned the Vaudevisuals Press book “Rose’s Royal Midgets and Other Little People of Vaudeville“. Here is the video excerpt from the show.

And if you want to read more about the book visit the great review from Circopedia‘s founder/director Dominique Jando here.

You can get Rose’s Royal book here!

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Photography Rose's Royal Midget Troupe Vaudeville Vaudevisuals Bookshelf Vaudevisuals Press

“Rose’s Royal Midgets and Other Little People of Vaudeville”. A Review by Dominique Jando.

In the first half of the twentieth century, performing troupes of Little People ⏤ then popularly known as Midgets ⏤ were undeniably, in Europe or in the United States, the main drawing cards of any variety or circus production that featured them. After their appearance in M-G-M’s “The Wizard of Oz,” the Munchkins’ everlasting fame has been a testimony to their timeless appeal. “Midgets” were not to be confused with Little People victim of achondroplasia: unlike the latter, they were perfectly proportioned, looking like amazingly gifted children who had just fled Neverland. Endearing to their audiences, they were also genuinely talented performers, and if only for that reason, their place in show business history is indeed worthy of attention.

“Rose’s Royal Midgets and Other Little People of Vaudeville,” published by Vaudevisuals Press, justly gives them the long-overdue attention they deserve as performing artists: the very short bibliography appearing at the end of the book sadly shows how little has been written about them, unless they appeared under the generic denomination of “freaks” in a few books related to carnival and circus sideshows — an even more derogatory term than “Midgets,” especially for the true performers they often were.

Trav S.D., American vaudeville’s foremost historian and keeper of the flame (whose book “No Applause, Just Throw the Money” is a must for anyone curious about vaudeville), tells us in a well-researched essay the history of Ike Rose and his Royal Midgets company, which forms the backbone of the book and benefits from precious documents in the personal collection of Karen McCarty — whose grandmother, Gladys Farkas, was a member of Rose’s company. Besides rare photographs, reproductions of contracts, advertising booklets, and programs give us a wonderful insight into the life of the troupes of that era.

In another well-illustrated essay, Trav introduces us to other famous Little People, from P.T. Barnum’s Tom Thumb (Charles Stratton) to the Doll Family (born Schneider) and many lesser-known individuals and troupes, with biographical notices that finally take them out of the shadows. The book opens with an essay by James Taylor (author of “Shocked and Amazed! On & Off the Midway”) on performing Little People’s reaction to the much too frequent use of the derogatory terminology that usually describes them, whether or not in a professional context. It ends with a gallery of Charles Eisenmann’s photographic portraits of Little People (from the Syracuse University Library’s Ronald G. Becker Collection) dating back to the 1880s.

Edited and published by Jim Moore, photographer to the circus stars, “Rose’s Royal Midgets and Other Little People of Vaudeville” is a wonderful tribute to bona-fide artists who, notwithstanding the special appeal of their physical peculiarity, were by and large talented actors, singers, dancers, comedians, and circus performers who certainly deserved more than a quick footnote in the history of show business.

Dominique Jando ~ Circopedia

Ike Rose and his troupe visiting the White House in 1926.
A review of Rose's Royal Midgets and Other Little People of Vaudeville by Circopedia's founder/director Dominique Jando.
Dudley Foster photographed by Charles Eisenmann.
From the Charles Eisenmann section of Rose’s Royal Midgets and Other Little People of Vaudeville.
Courtesy of the Ronald G. Becker Collection of Charles Eisenmann Photographs

To purchase the book click here!

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Book Shelf Performing Arts Vaudevisuals Bookshelf

Vaudevisuals Bookshelf – “The Drama of Celebrity”

The Drama of Celebrity by Sharon Marcus

Why do so many people care so much about celebrities? Who decides who gets to be a star? What are the privileges and pleasures of fandom? Do celebrities ever deserve the outsized attention they receive?

In this fascinating and deeply researched book, Sharon Marcus challenges everything you thought you knew about our obsession with fame. Icons are not merely famous for being famous; the media alone cannot make or break stars; fans are not simply passive dupes. Instead, journalists, the public, and celebrities themselves all compete, passionately and expertly, to shape the stories we tell about celebrities and fans. The result: a high-stakes drama as endless as it is unpredictable.

Drawing on scrapbooks, personal diaries, and vintage fan mail, Marcus traces celebrity culture back to its nineteenth-century roots, when people the world over found themselves captivated by celebrity chefs, bad-boy poets, and actors such as the “divine” Sarah Bernhardt (1844–1923), as famous in her day as the Beatles in theirs. Known in her youth for sleeping in a coffin, hailed in maturity as a woman of genius, Bernhardt became a global superstar thanks to savvy engagement with her era’s most innovative media and technologies: the popular press, commercial photography, and speedy new forms of travel.

Whether you love celebrity culture or hate it, The Drama of Celebrity will change how you think about one of the most important phenomena of modern times.

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Get the book here!

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Bindlestiff Open Stage Variety Show Cabaret Clown Coffeehouse Chronicles Coney Island USA Dance Dixon Place Here Arts Center LaMaMa etc Music Performing Arts Photography Physical Theater Variety Arts Year in Review

Check out Vaudevisuals – Review – MARCH 2016

Vaudevisuals.comMarch 2016 Vaudevisuals Posts

This month I did quite a few interviews! Heather Litteer, Hilary Chaplain, Gus Solomons, Jr. and photographed the Bindlestiff Open Stage Variety Revue. A few books were mentioned too!

RED BULL THEATER PRESENTS – 2 DAY CLOWNING WORKSHOP

“WORDS” BY CHUCK WORKMAN – A 1987 COMPILATION OF HOLLYWOOD FILMS

VAUDEVISUALS INTERVIEW WITH HEATHER LITTEER – “LEMONADE”.

VAUDEVISUALS INTERVIEW WITH HILARY CHAPLAIN – “PHYSICAL COMEDY WORKSHOP”

BINDLESTIFF OPEN STAGE VARIETY REVUE – MARCH 7TH, 2016 @ DIXON PLACE

VAUDEVISUALS BOOKSHELF – “ZOOMAR” BY ERNIE KOVACS

COFFEEHOUSE CHRONICLES #132 – TALKING BAND – LAMAMA ETC – MARCH 12TH, 2016

VAUDEVISUALS INTERVIEW WITH GUS SOLOMONS JR. – “FROM THE HORSE’S MOUTH”

JUSTIN WEBER’S “WACKY OF WALLABAZOO” AT CONEY ISLAND USA

COFFEEHOUSE CHRONICLES #133 – JOHN KELLY – LAMAMA – MARCH 26TH, 2016

LaMama Coffeehouse Chronicles

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In the next few days I will post the April and May review posts. Stay tuned!