Categories
Coffeehouse Chronicles LaMaMa etc Performing Arts Puppetry Story Teller Video Women

REVISIT – LaMama Coffeehouse Chronicles #129 – Contemporary Puppet Theater

~ EDITOR’S COMMENTS ~

Five years ago LaMama theater presented this wonderful ‘Coffeehouse Chronicles’ examining the contemporary puppet theater from the 1970s to 2015. I thought it would bring some joy to those that missed this wonderful event and others to repost in these difficult times.


Contemporary Puppet Theater

Curator: Michal Gamily

Panelists: Ralph Lee, Roman Paska, Lake Simons and Amy Trompetter

Cheryl Henson introduces the evening’s agenda to the audience.


Federico Restrepo talks to the audience about his show “Undefined Fraction”. 

Lake Simons performs an excerpt from “Wind Set Up”.

Amy Trompetter talks to the audience about her history performing political theater with puppets.

Roman Paska talks about his work and the 1970’s and it’s influences

Coffeehouse Chronicles #129 participants: L to R – Amy Trompetter, Arthur Adair, Roman Paska, Lake Simons, Michal Gamily, Cheryl Henson, Jane Catherine Shaw, Ralph Lee.


Here are 2 videos that include much of the afternoon’s discussions.
Part 1 and Part 2

# # # # #

Categories
Clown LaMaMa etc Performing Arts Photography Physical Theater Vaudevisuals Interview Women

Vaudevisuals interview with Coleen MacPherson and Elodie Monteau – “This Is Why We Live”

Toronto’s Open Heart Surgery Theatre @LaMama Sept 19th-29th

Earlier today I had the pleasure of interviewing two members of Toronto’s “Open Heart Surgery Theatre” company. The director Coleen MacPherson and performer Elodie Monteau. They talked about the wonderful work they have been doing with the poems of Polish Nobel Prize-Winner Wislawa Szymborska and making movement from the unique words she created in her poetry.

For more information and/or tickets

Performed in 3 languages with live cello accompaniment by Dobrochna Zubek.

(English translation projected during foreign language segments.)

# # # # #

Categories
Coffeehouse Chronicles History LaMaMa etc Performing Arts Photography Video Women

Coffeehouse Chronicles #151: Ethyl Eichelberger @LaMama

Celebrating the life and work of Ethyl Eichelberger with panelists, live performances and archival materials!
Moderated by Miss Joan Marie Moossy 
Panelists: Brian BelovitchJoe E JeffreysJohn KellyLori E SeidBlack Eyed Susan and Mark Russell
Performances by: Jennifer Miller with Heather Green | Jeremy Halpern with Auntie Belle.

Coffeehouse Chronicles’ Michal Gamily introduces the event.

(l to r) Miss Joan Marie Moossy, Joe E. Jeffries, Mark Russell, Lori E. Seid, John Kelly

Black Eyed Susan performing a short piece written for her by Ethyl Eichelberger.

Still from short film by Peter Hujar featuring Ethyl Eichelberger shown at event.

Coffeehouse Chronicles #151 Panel and performers.

For more information on upcoming Coffeehouse Chronicles visit this site.

# # # # #

Categories
Coffeehouse Chronicles Dance LaMaMa etc

La MaMa | 57th Season

Being a big fan of LaMama I present to you the new promo video for their 57th Season!

Upcoming highlights include a session of Coffeehouse Chronicles dedicated to the work of Andrei Serban followed in November by a session on puppeteer genius Ralph Lee.

Also coming this season is the La MaMa Puppet Festival.

For more information on other great performances and events visit: LaMama

# # # # #

Categories
Cabaret Comedy LaMaMa etc Music Photography Video Women Writer

Springtime in Nickyland – April 7th, 2018

Springtime in Nickyland – LaMama ETC.

Held in the very intimate Downstairs Lounge (while the regular ‘Club’ is being renovated)

Nicky Paraiso brought in a nice variety of performers for this evenings performance.

Nicky rings the ‘traditional’ LaMama bell to begin the performance.

In his personal style, Nicky talks with the audience using very expressive gestures.

Calling to the ‘heavens’ to bring order to the current situation.

Nicky talks about his trip to Norway and other worldly issues.

Laurie Stone reads from her new book ‘My Life as an Animal’.

Reading moments of comedic text bring a smile to her face.

Piotr Gawelko reads his poetry. 

Piotr Gawelko reads his poetry off his laptop. Born in Poland and published “The City of Missing People” in 2014.

Abigail Gampel brought a wonderfully great voice to the evening’s festivities.

With passion and finesse, Abigail enthralled the audience with her singing.

Paul Hallasy brought comedy to the stage with an excerpt from his one-man show.

Paul had many adventures to share with the audience with his experiences as a ‘doorman’.

Gordon Beeferman attempted to sing an original composition about birds but…

In addition to singing an original composition, Nicky also ended the show with the audience joining in on “Downtown”.

Check out the LaMama calendar for other upcoming cultural events.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Program Notes:

In the spirit of rebirth, renewal, and the resurrection of the spirit, curator and host Nicky Paraiso addresses the current political and social climate in a serious attempt to investigate and celebrate the origins of cabaret.

Although the 19th-century French definition referred to any business serving liquor, a cabaret in the early 20th century was an informal salon or safe place, as it were, where poets, artists, and composers could share ideas and compositions, present new works-in-progress and decry the political ills of the day. Exemplary writers and performers extraordinaire are invited to respond to recent life-changing and transformational events while songs continue to be sung with entertaining consequence.

# # # # #

Yoshiko Chuma & The School of Hard Knocks presented a video of their tour in Europe.

Categories
LaMaMa etc Music Performing Arts Physical Theater Story Teller Video Women Writer

Dario D’Ambrosi returns to La Mama – “Follies in Titus”


Interview during Panel Discussion at LaMama during the 2015 season of Teatro Patologico Company.

~ ~ ~

“Follies in Titus”

Directed by Dario D’Ambrosi
Recent winner of the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Italia Award
 December 1 – 9, 2017 – 6 performances only!

$25 Adult Tickets; $20 Students/Seniors + $1 Facility Fee

Running Time: 1 hour

 Follies in Titus is directed by Italy’s Dario D’Ambrosi, the originator of the theatrical movement called Teatro Patologico (Pathological Theater), who re-imagines Shakespeare’s “Titus Andronicus,” retelling the bard’s bloodiest and most violent work through the voices of the patients of a psychiatric hospital. The play is performed by actors from the Integrated Theater of the Emotions, an Italian university program in performing arts that he founded for people with physical, intellectual and developmental disabilities.
“Follies in Titus” was influenced by the intrinsic confrontation with human violence that “Titus Andronicus” evokes in both its audience and its interpreters. This 16th-century tragedy, Shakespeare’s first and bloodiest, is the fictional story of Titus, a general during the late Roman Empire, who engages in a cycle of revenge with Tamora, Queen of the Goths. Titus’ murder of Tamora’s eldest son in a ritual of war leads to the rape and mutilation of his own daughter, Lavinia. As his revenge, Titus murders Tamora’s remaining sons bakes them into a pie and serves them to her at a feast.
The focus of the production is not on Shakespeare’s mixture of horror and vengeance, but rather on the alternation of true and feigned madness. Through a careful exploration of the pathological and psychotic behavior of the protagonists of the play, D’Ambrosi, and his collaborators reduced the original text to its essential elements, giving space to the creativity of its actors, who re-tell the play in a fantastical narration through the eyes of psychiatric patients.
Teatro Patologico was founded by Dario D’Ambrosi, one of Italy’s most distinguished theater artists, who has made a career of productions about people with psychiatric disabilities, devising productions that portray their unique perspective on life. The main intent in “La magia del teatro” (The Magic of Theatre), the Drama Academy for disabled children directed by Dario D’ambrosi, which counts more than 60 students each year, is to stimulate the students’ creative freedom by giving them the theoretical and practical means to help them express themselves on the stage. The school (and the final project at the end of the academic year) isn’t so much a form of therapy as it is an amazing chance for them to express both artistically and emotionally, a place where they get to socialize and form important life skills, a serious vehicle of fun and a way to make the students feel and be the main actors.

The Ellen Stewart Theatre
66 East 4th Street
New York, NY 10003

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Tickets can be purchased here!

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Categories
Exhibit Magic Performing Arts Photography Puppetry Story Teller Video

The Theatre of Robert Anton – An Exhibition

The Theater of Robert Anton

It must have been early 1980’s, and I was working (performing as a mime) at an upstate NY fair “German Alps Festival” at Hunter Moutain. The festival included many performers and once in awhile we would meet up after the day’s work was done and attend a show or movie together. One day puppeteer Eric Bass recommended that we see this show with puppeteer Robert Anton.

The performance was one of the most hypnotic performances I have ever witnessed! Wearing only black pants and black top he performed with a neutral facial expression while making his little puppets come alive. Since he did not allow recordings of any of his performances the work remains legendary. I will leave the details of his show to others to describe.

I was delighted to see that Broadway 1602 Gallery had mounted an exhibit of his puppets with other articles from his shows and work. I have included video interviews (courtesy of Broadway 1602 Gallery) and photographs from the show here. Thanks to Broadway 1602 for allowing me to capture this beautiful exhibit and post documents and photographs from it.

 Robert Anton passed away at age 35 in 1984.

Robert AntonRobert Anton in one of the few photographs taken of him during his show.

(Courtesy Broadway 1602 Gallery)

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

– a couple of scenes from the work of Robert Anton, a beloved puppeteer of the nineteen-seventies: “Anton as puppeteer-surgeon sometimes probes his figures with a tiny forceps, pulling out a brain or a heart, or finding inside (in one show) a red stone, a red branch, a red starfish, red feathers, and red fur. In another show, a bag lady who has assembled herself out of a heap of miniature refuse peers into the puppeteer’s own mouth in search of new objects.”

Excerpt from “Puppet: An Essay on Uncanny Life” by Kenneth Gross

Robert AntonA rare photograph of Robert Anton during a performance. (Courtesy of Broadway 1602 Gallery)

(Courtesy of Broadway 1602 Gallery)

~ ~ ~

Letter from Diana Vreeland at Metropolitan Museum to Robert after one of his performances.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

“A visionary theater of whose scale is inversely proportional to the scope of Robert Wilson’s vast panorama is the puppet theater of Robert Anton. Performing rituals of transformation and rebirth and original alchemical allegories with an Artaudian emphasis are miniature finger-puppet actors, whose heads are no larger than one and a half inches. They enact these silent and mysterious rites on a small black velvet stage before an audience of no more than eighteen spectators.”

Gloria Feman Orenstein, “The Theater of the Marvelous”, New York University Press, 1975

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

“His inventions would look to him for reassurance. That was always very moving…His movements of the face were minimal, withholding of himself, a supreme actor…He could express powerful contempt: The pope with an absurd mitra, degraded to cardinal/bishop, gets closed in a jail tower in his finery…then becomes a blind man tapping. Then a horrid puppet with leather gear and a shaved head, a lot like Himmler –pisses on a target on that prison. He’s got one leg, walks with a crutch…diabolical. (Something right out of George Grosz.) Three visual artists were most important to him: Bosch, Redon and Grosz…The puppets he took to the Plaza to show Fellini…He knew Fellini’s movies inside out. The one that meant the most to him was TOBY DAMMIT, also JULIET OF THE SPIRITS…Nino Rota’s music. He unconditionally respected Chaikin and Stella Adler. When she came to his performances, she talked throughout to the puppets. …The play involved a redemption from the world, an overcoming – a metaphysical confrontation.”

Benjamin Taylor, “Robert Anton in Retrospect,” Theater Ex, 1986

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Main room of the Broadway 1602 Gallery featuring the puppets of Robert Anton.

Secondary room featuring works on paper and cases displaying fragile clothing and documents.

Robert Anton’s entire show was carried in these suitcases. The interiors were divided up into precisely made sections of felt backed compartments that housed the puppets and small masks/props for the show.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

THE ACTORS

Off all the puppet actors I photographed this one reminded me of how ‘real’ the characters in his plays were when he animated them. Robert only allowed 15 people at a time to attend his performances and the images here are what the puppet actors would have looked like had you been one of those audience members as I was.  If you want to see more of the exhibit visit the Broadway 1602 Gallery website here.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

From Broadway 1602 Gallery Exhibit Notes

Already from the tender age of nine, Anton followed an original childhood impulse to create en miniature: He re-built the stage sets of famous Broadway musicals he had seen with his parents in New York and London, reduced to a proscenium of 18” across and 12” high, and yet so breathtaking in detail and elegant precision that Anton was endorsed by journalists in his hometown Forth Worth in the mid 1960s as the “ingenuity of a Michelangelo”.

Anton arrived in New York in 1970, after two years of stage and costume design studies at Carnegie-Mellon University. He continued his studies in New York at the Studio and Forum of Stage Design.  In 1973, collaborating with the composer Elizabeth Swados, Anton designed the scenery for the Broadway musical “Elizabeth I” — his drawings for the queen’s costume survived. In the same year, his collaborations with Ellen Stewart’s La MaMa theatre began where he also staged his own plays. Repeat performances took place in his apartment on West 70th Street. Among the enthused audience and supporters were La MaMa Playwright and director Jean-Claude van Itallie, who was inspired by Anton’s ‘actors’ and started introducing puppets to his own plays, writer Susan Sontag and her son David Rieff, famed acting teacher Stella Adler, childhood friend and novelist Benjamin Taylor (Anton features as “the puppeteer” in his autobiographical debut novel “Tales out of School”, 1995), actress Linda Hunt who was soon to become a star in Robert Altman and David Lynch’s movies, theatre revolutionary Peter Brook, Broadway tap dancer, singer and choreographer Tommy Tune, Broadway’s director legend Hal Prince, the doyenne of the fashion world Diana Vreeland, Yoko Ono and John Lennon, to name a few.

Between 1974-75 Anton presented his puppet theatre at Robert Wilson’s Byrd Hoffmann Foundation and directed at the National Theater of the Deaf in Waterford, CT. His tour through Europe began, first performing at the Mickery Theater in Amsterdam. In 1975 Anton represented the United States at the International Theater Festival in Nancy, France, causing an avalanche of enthusiastic reviews in the French press depicting Anton’s miniature theatre as one of the most memorable and outstanding acts of the festival. The Nancy engagement introduced Anton to France’s flamboyant cultural minister Jacques Lang. In 1976, President Francois Mitterand and Jacques Lang designated the Château de Vincennes outside of Paris for Anton to set up his studio and living quarters and to perform for one year. Anton presented his plays and co-founded a visual/mime theatre program for the deaf-mute at the Chateau. In 1977 he created a new production for the Festival D’Automne in Paris.

Upon his return to New York in 1978, Anton moved to a large loft on 96 Spring Street and presented nightly performances of the “Paris Spectacle”. In 1981 Robert Anton was appointed as the American representative at the Theater der Welt Festival in Cologne. In the same year, he performed at the Teatro Argentina in Rome where he met Fellini again.

In the early 1980s, Anton’s experimentation took him to new stage designs, a move connecting him back to his childhood Broadway musical stages while the ‘actors’ fade into the background. Anton created glamorous miniature stage sets as “an homage to the 1940s” (Benjamin Taylor), sets like ‘Radio City Hall’ animated with grand and witty gestures to the tunes of Fred Astaire and Busby Berkeley. From there, Anton further radicalized his concepts. His last work was a play composed purely of light, exploring the psychological impact and metaphysical dimension of color, once more elaborately staged in a miniature proscenium: “A third final spectacle remained unfinished at this death. Totally unpopulated, it would have been an evocative constellation of set, sound, and light.” (Genii Grassi, “Robert Anton in Retrospect”, Theater Ex, 1986).

In an endeavor to bring back to a contemporary audience — and to the many of his generation who were not part of the blessed and illustrious able to see his performances — the experience of Robert Anton’s theatre, we interviewed on film, and continue to do so, witnesses of his plays and his life, friends and peers who were close to Anton’s universe. These dedicated and moving testimonies are an integral part of the exhibition and will constitute the core of a future documentary on The Theatre of Robert Anton.

We would like to express our gratitude to Bette Stoler who brought The Theatre of Robert Anton to us and who shared her memories of her friend and his context with us to help to realize the project. We also would like to thank Anton’s friends and peers who so generously shared their memories with us in the filmed interviews giving such rich testimony to Anton’s history.

Anke Kempkes

“The Theatre of Robert Anton” at BROADWAY 1602 UPTOWN, December 2016 – February 2017

~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Documentary film produced in the context of the exhibition “The Theatre of Robert Anton” by BROADWAY 1602 
Interviewed are the following people:
Benjamin Taylor – Writer
Rosemary Quinn – Theater Director, Actress, Teacher
Jeremy Lebensohn – Sculptor, Set Designer
Tommy Tune – Actor, Dancer, Director
Terry Rosenberg – Artist
Bette Stoler – former Gallerist, friend.
~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Robert Anton Exhibit in the Press:
~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Broadway 1602 is a wonderful gallery located at 5 East 63rd St, NYC. For more information about upcoming exhibits visit their website here.
Categories
Photography Year in Review

Check out Vaudevisuals.com – Feburary 2016 Review today!

Vaudevisuals.comFeb/2016 Postings from Vaudevisuals.com

THE VAUDEVISUALS BOOKSHELF – RUSSIAN CLOWN BY OLEG POPOV

WILLIAM CASTLE’S 1974 FILM “SHANKS” WITH MARCEL MARCEAU

THE VAUDEVISUALS BOOKSHELF – “LE CENTRE DU SILENCE WORKBOOK”

UNTITLED THEATER COMPANY NO. 61 – PAUL AUSTER’S NOVEL “CITY OF GLASS”

LAMAMA COFFEEHOUSE CHRONICLES #131 – MABOU MINES

VAUDEVISUALS INTERVIEW WITH EDWARD EINHORN – ‘CITY OF GLASS’

VAUDEVISUALS INTERVIEW WITH JAMES HILLIER – DIRECTOR OF “INSIGNIFICANCE”

 VAUDEVISUALS INTERVIEW WITH ANNE HAMBUGER – ENGARDE ARTS

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Tomorrow will feature the March postings from 2016.

Categories
Coffeehouse Chronicles Comedy LaMaMa etc Performing Arts Photography Puppetry Story Teller Video Women Writer

COFFEEHOUSE CHRONICLES #136 – Theodora Skipitares – LaMama – October 8th, 2016

2016-10-08-puppets_099

Theodora Skipitares

On October 8th, 2016 La Mama presented their monthly series Coffeehouse Chronicles.

This afternoon was devoted to the work of visual theater artist/puppeteer Theodora Skipitares.

Coffeehouse Chronicles #136

Curator: Michal Gamily

Moderator: JoAnne Akalaitis

Panelists: Andrea Balis, Claudia Orenstein, Jane Catherine Shaw

Part of the 2016 La Mama Puppet Series 

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Categories
LaMaMa etc Performing Arts Photography Puppetry Women Workshop

Puppet Series 55 @LaMamaEtc _ Sept 24th – Nov 6th, 2016

LaMama Etc Puppet Series
LaMama Etc Puppet Series beginning Sept 24th thru Nov.6th,2016 
(Pictured here is Kevin Augustine in The Lone Wolf Tribe’s “The God Projekt”. Photograph ©2016 Jim R Moore )

img022LaMama Etc Puppet Series Calendar

For more information and/or tickets go here!

~ ~ ~ ~ ~