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Bindlestiff Open Stage Variety Show Comedy Dixon Place Music Performing Arts Photography Story Teller Variety Arts Video Women

March 2020 – Bindlestiff Open Stage @Dixon Place

So. for starters we are now in ‘Lockdown’ in New York City. The next Bindlestiff Open Stage Variety Show will be broadcast to you on the internet. I will try and take some screenshots for those folks who won’t be able to watch. Here is last month’s show in pictures!

Bindlestiff’s co-founder and host for the show Keith Nelson takes the first slot in the show for his ‘Chinese yoyo’ routine.

Maks and Chelsea perform their hysterical antics.

In the spirit of vaudeville Keith takes his time winding the string on his top.

Keith gives an example of how ‘folks’ use to have longer attention spans and looks at the top.

Mariko Iwasa invites an audience member to be part of her performance ‘tea’ ceremony.

The volunteer clad in a Japanese kimono and waiting to sample the tea that Mariko is pouring.

Delaney Bayes performed a beautifully lyrical juggling routine with grace and finesse.

Keith threw a potato into the air and caught on a fork. Nice move!

Ellia Klein was amazing in her contortion act.

Mark Gindick came on stage with a ‘singer’ persona but it changed when Michael Bongar intruded.

And then he recruited an audience member that was blown away by Michael Bongar leaf blower!

Molly Siksin performed on the trapeze with skill and abandonment.

Cassandra Nemser was very vocal (she sang Opera) while escaping from her straightjacket.

Miss 360 performed a deLIGHTful hula hoop routine.

Cleo Carol Knopf sang an original song about her ‘hero’ Bernie Sanders!

Jean-Taé S. Francis performed a charming ‘rola-bola’ act.

Surprising the audience with his Spider-Man costume was aerialist Shawn E. Shawn.

~On April 6th, 2020 The Bindlestiff Open Stage Show will be Broadcast on the internet~

I hope you enjoy this new VERSION of the show! Stay tuned for more information.

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Categories
Cinema Photography Silent Film Video

Lon Chaney – Guest Blogger – Lea Stans from ‘Silent-ology’

LON CHANEY

“Perhaps few actors have enjoyed such a cult following as the great Lon Chaney, whose remarkable makeup and acting skills have inspired generations of film lovers. I am pleased to present this article from my blog, Silent-ology, on the life and career of a man who became a legend in his own time. –Lea Stans”

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Lon Chaney, Hollywood’s Finest Character Actor

Per a reader’s request, here is a piece on one of the greatest and most respected silent film legends–Lon Chaney. As you read this, I am currently at the San Francisco Silent Film Festival–and yes, I’ll be recapping every moment of it!

There was a popular, widespread joke back in the 1920s–“Don’t step on that spider, it might be Lon Chaney!” A joke which, of course, referred to his remarkable use of makeup and acting skills to create bizarre characters who stick in the popular imagination. Indeed, Chaney was one of the rare actors who was so skilled that he became a legend in his own time, graced with the title “The Man of a Thousand Faces”–a title which is linked with his name to this very day.

His birth name was Leonidas Frank Chaney, and he was born in Colorado Springs on April 1, 1883. His parents, Frank and Emma, were both deaf and mute. They had met at the Colorado School for the Education of Mutes, which had been founded by Chaney’s grandfather. Being the child of parents who couldn’t hear or speak, Chaney became adept at pantomime, which proved a useful training ground for his career–not only because of the pantomime used in early films, but because it made him more in tune with facial expressions and subtle gestures. When Chaney’s mother fell ill and developed rheumatism in her hands, she and Chaney reportedly would communicate only with their eyes.

As a young man Chaney quickly became set on having a stage career, and in 1902 he began working in vaudeville. He enjoyed a variety of stage roles and would also assist with Universalcostumes, makeup and choreography. In 1905 he married stage singer Cleva Creighton, and on February 10, 1906, their son Creighton Tull Chaney was born (he would one day go by Lon Chaney Jr.). It’s said that little Creighton was born premature and not breathing and that Lon, not knowing what else to do, rushed outside into the cold, knocked a hole in the ice of a lake and dunked the infant in the water, shocking him back to life.

Unfortunately, the marriage proved to be an unhappy one, involving jealousy and Cleva’s growing drinking problem. In April 1913 the Chaneys were in Los Angeles where Lon was working at the Majestic Theater. One day Cleva went to the theater, stood in the wings and attempted suicide by drinking mercuric chloride. While this dark, dramatic gesture didn’t claim her life, it did destroy her singing voice and caused a scandal that essentially put an end to Chaney’s theatrical career. He would divorce Cleva and take custody of his son, and with his stage options now closed, he had no choice but to fall back on a less lofty line of work–acting in motion pictures. (At least, it was less lofty back in 1913.)

He became an extra at Universal, partly because of his skill with makeup, and soon proved himself to be a reliable supporting actor. His earliest role that we can confirm was in Poor Jake’s Demise (1913), starring comedians Max Asher and Louise Fazenda. In 1914 he would remarry a woman named Hazel Hastings, and it would be a happy and lasting union.

Over the next few years, Chaney appeared in dozens and dozens of films, playing a wide variety of characters and often specializing in villains–an easy fit for a man with the square-jawed, rough-hewn face of a boxer or a steelworker. He grew deeply interested in creating detailed makeup effects and would photograph his various experiments to pinpoint what would be convincing onscreen. He kept his various greasepaints and other tools of transformation in a simple lunchbox–one day he would use a toolbox.

Chaney attracted attention as the villain Hame Bozzam in William S. Hart’s western Riddle Gawne (1918), but he got his breakthrough role in the drama The Miracle Man (1919). Chaney played a contortionist nicknamed “The Frog” who’s part of a gang that moves to a small town to escape the police. They discover that a faith healer has much of the town in thrall. They decide to scam the townspeople by having The Frog pose as a cripple and pretend to be miraculously healed and then use the resulting excitement to collect funds–supposedly for a chapel. But their plans go awry when a little boy really does experience a miraculous healing, and the gang’s, shall we say, “faith in fakery” is shaken.

Sadly, much of this intriguing The Miracle Man is lost, but luckily surviving clips show The Frog experiencing his “miraculous” healing. Chaney’s exceptional use of jerky body language to convey crippled limbs becoming straight is so convincing that to this day many people believe he was double-jointed, or at least knew how to dislocate his shoulders–not so. The performance put Chaney on the map as an exceptional and in-demand character actor.

Picture-Play Magazine interviewed Chaney in 1920, and the writer noted with some surprise:

The longer I talked with Lon Chaney the more paradoxical he proved to be. I had expected to find he was a circus contortionist or, at least, a veteran character actor. He is merely a talented young man with a hobby for cooking, painting, wood carving, modeling in clay, and in grease paint. He contradicts all notions of what an actor and villain should be…Acting to him means the creation of a man, whereas most of our favorite actors portray their personalities as pigment, Chaney, like the artist of sculpting or painting, creates from an imaginative model which has nothing to do with himself.

This would prove to be a rare peek into Chaney’s home life. Soon he would shy away from interviews and steer clear of Hollywood social events, preferring to keep the focus on his characters. He would once say: “My whole career has been devoted to keeping people from knowing me. It has taken me years to build up a mystery surrounding myself, which is my stock in trade.”

The Moving Picture Weekly, December 1920.

The Penalty (1920) is a fascinating example of his commitment to that stock in trade. Chaney plays a criminal whose legs were unnecessarily amputated above the knee after a childhood accident, and who finally decides to take revenge on the doctor. Chaney tied his legs back with special harnesses and walked on his kneecaps to portray the amputee, which was so painful that he could only act for ten minutes at a time. Originally, the film included a shot at the end of Chaney walking down a staircase–to prove the actor did have normal legs.

His fame only increased with The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923), a huge hit that featured his most extreme makeup. As the grotesquely deformed Quasimodo, Chaney used layers of cotton and colodium on his face and sported fake teeth and a 20-lb hump on his back, all of which took three hours to put together. He also used a brace to keep himself in a hunched-over position special contact lenses and (in the 1920s these would’ve been made of glass). He was paid the generous salary of $2500 a week–a big achievement for someone who, in his early Universal days, was once told he would never be worth more than $100 a week.

Other iconic roles included the circus clown HE in He Who Gets Slapped (1924), the first film to begin production with the newly-formed MGM studio; Sergeant O’Hara in Tell It to the Marines (1926), which earned Chaney an honorary membership in the U.S. Marine Corps; and, of course, the titular Phantom of The Phantom of the Opera (1925). Chaney’s elaborate makeup was kept a complete secret, for maximum screen effect. Not only did the famous unmasking scene scare the daylights out of countless audiences (publicity stories claimed some people fainted), but it seems to have stuck in their minds long after other movie memories had faded. Even decades later, old-timers would recall their childhood terror of first seeing that ghastly face.

Chaney’s other iconic role is one we haven’t even seen–the ghoulish character from the thoroughly lost London After Midnight (1927). With his pointed teeth, long hair, and top hat, Chaney was the embodiment of many a Halloween haunted house decoration. Although it’s one of the most sought-after silent films (despite getting lackluster reviews in its own day), London After Midnight, unfortunately, shows no signs of turning up.

Tod Browning’s The Unknown is not only one of Chaney’s bizarre best but it also contains one of the rawest moments of horror in cinematic history. (SPOILERS at the end of this paragraph.) Chaney is Alonzo the Armless, a performer who secretly binds his arms to pose as a circus freak with a knife-throwing act (he keeps his hands out of sight so his double thumb can’t identify him as a former criminal). He falls hard for beautiful Nanon, a fellow performer who has a phobia of men’s arms and can’t stand being touched by them. But she’s comfortable around Alonzo, and he’s so head-over-heels in love that he decides to go through an unbelievably extreme act of devotion–have his arms amputated so they can be together. Unfortunately, his rival, the strongman, is able to overcome Nanon’s phobia and Alonzo finds out too late that he’s had his arms amputated for nothing–a truly horrifying moment of realization that Chaney plays to the hilt.

Chaney wasn’t enthused about the advent of talkies, feeling that if audiences heard his voice it would destroy his mystique. Eventually, he was talked into appearing in the crime drama The Unholy Three (1930), playing the ventriloquist Echo–and giving a solid performance. But sadly, it would be his final film. Lung cancer, which he had been secretly enduring for some time, finally claimed his life on August 26, 1930, after he began hemorrhaging uncontrollably. The news he had been taken to the hospital had moved countless fans to call the studio offering to donate blood, and the news of his death shocked both the public and the industry alike.

Fortunately, Chaney’s elaborate makeups were not doomed to obscurity. Today he continues to awe and inspire, one of the rare actors whose work is considered untouchable. And it’s moved some of his fans to declare, “Lon Chaney Shall Not Die!”

Sources:

Howe, Herbert. “A Miracle Man of Makeup.” Picture-Play Magazine, March, 1920.

Gebhart, Myrtle. “The Last of Mr. Chaney.” Picture-Play Magazine, September, 1930.

Everson, William K. American Silent Film. New York: Da Capo Press, 1998.

Koszarski, Richard. The Age of the Silent Feature Picture, 1915-1928. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1990.

“Chaney Dies As Fan Thousands Swamp Phone; Scores Offer Blood.” Variety, August 27, 1930.

http://lantern.mediahist.org

https://www.biography.com/people/lon-chaney-9244177

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lon_Chaney

https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0151606/?ref_=tt_ov_st_sm

I highly recommend this classic documentary on Chaney’s life–another important source for this article!

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Special Thanks to
Lea Stans and her blog ‘Silent-ology‘.

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Categories
Big Apple Circus Circus Performing Arts Vaudevisuals Interview Video Women

Vaudevisuals interview with contortionist Elayne Kramer – Big Apple Circus

BIG APPLE CIRCUS

The great, entertaining and delightful Big Apple Circus is back at Lincoln Center for the Holiday Season! With it are many amazingly brilliant acts that include Elayne Kramer.

Elayne is a contortionist and is interviewed here by Vaudevisual’s  Karen Jenson.

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Here is a glimpse of Elayne Kramer performing at the Circus Awards Ceremony in 2015

And here is a sample of what you will see if you attend The Big Apple Circus!

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Now through Jan. 7th 2018

For more information and to purchase tickets go HERE!

Categories
Aerial Acts American Circus Baruch Performing Arts Center Clown Comedy Vaudevisuals Interview Video Women

Vaudevisuals interview with Mark Gindick and Mark Lonergan – ‘Circo de la Luna’

It’s not every day that a new circus comes to town. Especially an exotic, sensual and comedic one. That is Circo de la Luna!

Here is Mark Lonergan (director) and Mark Gindick (clown) talking about the upcoming show.

Produced by Amanda Topaz and starring Sonia Olla.

Featuring the following performers:

Ismael Fernandez

Sarah Sophie Flicker

Mark Gindick

Olga Karmansky

AJ Silver

Amanda Topaz

Anna Venizelos

 

Screen Shot 2016-04-14 at 2.18.25 PM

CLICK HERE FOR TICKET INFORMATION

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Categories
Photography Video

Miss Ekatarina performing at Bindlestiff Family Circus Cabaret – Feb 2014

High above the Cirkus ring, Miss Ekaterina helps Bindlestiff Family Cirkus celebrate its 20th Annual Cirkus Cabaret season at the Brooklyn Lyceum. Ekat is a World and European Champion Rhythmic Gymnast having attained this title while a member of the Russian National Team. For the past decade she has been independently performing contortion, aerial arts and physical comedy all over US and Worldwide. She appeared in HBO's 'Bored to Death' and Julie Taymor's film 'Across the Universe'. And she is a regular member of the New York based Bindlestiff Family Cirkus.
http://www.bindlestiff.org

Categories
Bindlestiff Open Stage Variety Show Clown Dixon Place Juggling Magic Performing Arts Photography Variety Arts

Bindlestiff Open Stage Variety Show – Sept. 3rd, 2012 at Dixon Place

Keith Nelson warms up the audience with his opening act.

Keith Nelson is always adding new moves to his amazing diabolo act.

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Audrey Crabtree and Billy Schultz

Audrey Crabtree and Billy Schultz performing “No Reservations Needed”.

Directed by John Towsen and Piano by Will Shaw.

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Torkova

Torkova performs amazing tricks with money.

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Helena Reynolds

Helena Reynolds performs her hula hoop act.

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Gustavo Pace Estefan

Gustavo Pace Estefan performing a new piece of monolog.

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Joe Showers

Joe Showers performing with his own kendama.

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Josh Bisker prepares the silk fabric for the next act.

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Amanda Hackman

Amanda Hackman performing on the silks.

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Keith Nelson – Plate Spinner

Keith completes 7 spinning plates.

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Alberto Burgos

Alberto Burgos performs a funny monolog skit.

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Amazing Amy

Amazing Amy performs contortions with disbelief.

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Helena Reynolds

Helena Reynolds amazes the audience with her skill.

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Categories
Clown Juggling Mr Aviner's Variety HOur Music Photography Variety Arts

Mr. Aviner’s Variety Hour – At Dixon Place – April 27th & 28th. A Preview with interviews!

Last year I photographed an amazing collection of young variety artist that came to NY to perform in the show “Mr. Aviner’s Variety Hour’.

It was one of the best shows of young and fresh talent I had come across in a while.

Next month Josh Aviner is producing the 2nd edition of this show. I had a chance to sit down with Josh and the show’s MC Book Kennison with his associate Mike Dobson.

They spoke about the show in different ways and as such I have broke up the interviews in three parts.

Here is the link for the upcoming show! Get your tickets early as I am sure it will SELL OUT!

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Book Kennison talks about the upcoming “Mr. Aviner’s Variety Hour”.

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