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Burlesque Comedy Performing Arts Photography Sideshow Video Women

Southern Sideshow Hootenanny Benefit in NYC – @BeautyBarNYC

Once a Year in New Orleans… a unique gathering of special people occurs!

Southern Sideshow Hootenanny

To help raise funds for next year’s SSH event (The Lady Aye is a Board Member of SSH) NYC organized a special night @The Beauty Bar on 14th Street. The lineup was terrific and the torrential rain storm didn’t stop those of us that wanted to attend!

Here are some visuals in case you missed the event.

Hosting the evenings talent and festivities was The Lady Aye.

Mike Zohn showed off 2 antique panels from a magician’s cabinet probably used in the 1920’s.

Rob Romeo  showed his ‘nail shoes’ and then demonstrated for the audience.

Rob Romeo walking around the stage with his ‘nail shoes’ on. (painful?)

Matt Knife showed off his ‘nut sack’ and ‘other things’ during his boylesque act.

His costume was amazing and his stage presence hysterical.

The Lady Aye performed a classic sideshow act ‘the human blockhead’ but used silverware!

Betsy Propane heated up the room with her wonderful singing and straight jacket escape.

To cap off the show Gin Minsky tap danced and revealed a few things that delighted the audience.

In between the acts a lovely hostess sold ‘Raffle’ tickets for many prizes that were rewarded to the audience near the end of the evening.

Here is a video excerpt from Rob Romeo’s act!

CLICK HERE For more information and to keep up to date on the Southern Hootenanny Sideshow

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Categories
Book Shelf Cinema Film Photography Sideshow Women

SPURS – a short story by Tod Robbins

SPURS – by Tod Robbins

The short story that inspired the most notorious movie ever made!

– Tod Brownings ‘FREAKS

Spurs

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Categories
American Circus Art History Sideshow

Sideshow Banner Paintings

SNAP WYATT – Banner Painter

Snap Wyatt was a prolific painter of huge circus banners primarily in the 1940’s and 50’s.  He was known for his bold, cartoon-like style. His banners were painted with quick caricatures, and only the essential details of the performer were outlined in black to make them stand out. He said he could finish one in a day for about $85. bucks. The bright and colorful banners drew in the crowd with the mystery of what was inside the tent. Wyatt is considered to be among the top in his field. His banners today sell for thousands.

Sideshow banner painter Snap Wyatt and a handful of others including Fred Johnson, Tattoo Jack Cripe and Jack Sigler (now all deceased), brought art to the carnival midways of the 30’s through 60’s with their 10′ x10′ banners that waved outside the circus and carnival sideshows drawing the crowd to come inside.

Originally intended as silent talkers, the huge canvases played to a carnival attendees curiosity and directed them to walk right into the sideshow tent.

The banners portrayed the acts inside the tent and were an interesting combination of the bizarre and human oddities – from Major Debert Tiniest Man to the 643 pound Sweet Marie, Huey The Pretzel Boy to the Alligator Girl, Hydrocephalus Baby to The Penguin Boy.

Few considered the canvasses of sideshow banner painter Snap Wyatt and the other banner painters an art form at the time they were painted, yet today the mega-paintings are being bought almost as fast as they’re hung on an art gallery’s wall.

Snap Wyatt’s banners sell today for thousands. Snap Wyatt (1905-1984)

Some of the original posters are now part of the Kohler Foundation.

For more information and other posters by Snap Wyatt go here.

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