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Jango Edwards ~ Zirkolika de Circ Award 2020

Clown Jango Edwards wins the Circus Circus Award for Best Trajectory

  • The American artist, famous for his provocative style, is considered one of the benchmarks of the most contemporary language of clowns and has lived in Catalonia for almost 20 years.
  • Due to the new restrictions due to the pandemic, the Night of the Circus is readapted and will be a television broadcast without an audience where the winners of the eleventh edition of the Zirkòlika de Circ Awards will be announced (Mercat de les Flors, Wednesday 23, 19.00 h)
  • The clowns Pepa Plana and Noël Olivé, the juggler Totó, the young company Nom Provisional and the comics Toti Toronell and Pere Hosta, among others, will take part in the show Nit de Circ

The American clown Jango Edwards (Detroit, 1950) has won the Circus Zirkòlika Award for Best Trajectory for a long career that he has developed mainly in Europe and Catalonia. Considered one of the greatest references in the contemporary language of clowns and a representative of the so-called clown power, his humor between provocation and tenderness has always had a great impact on the public and critics. He has toured in theaters, circuses, and large venues in Europe, America, and Oceania, and for almost 20 years he has lived in Barcelona, ​​one of the headquarters of the Nouveau Clown Institute, the clown school he has been promoting since 2009.

Although he is known as Jango Edwards, his real name is Stanley Ted Edwards. He performed for the first time in Barcelona at the Saló Diana in 1977, and since then he has established very close links with circus and theater professionals in Catalonia, as he has recently shown. At the age of 70, last September he organized the festival The man, the myth and the legend at the La Gleva theater in Barcelona , where he shared the stage with artists such as Pepa Plana, Tortell Poltrona, Roberto Oliván, Andreu Buenafuente and Mario Gas. Throughout his career he has created, among others, the shows Penzilpeeni Zircus , Nothing but the truth , Nightmirrors , and Garbage, which established him in the eighties as a reference artist and clown.

Circus Night readapts

On the other hand, and due to the new restrictions due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the Circus Night gala is readapted and will be a television broadcast that will be broadcast next Wednesday the 23rd, from 19:00 hours. . It can be followed live on the social networks of the magazine Zirkòlika (YouTube and Facebook) and watched in full from 23.00ha through laxarxa.com and 14 other channels of the Local Television Network.

The winners of the eleventh edition will be announced in this broadcast. The show, without audience, will feature live music by the group Sakapatú and performances by clowns Pepa Plana and Nöel Olivé and comics Toti Toronell and Pere Hosta . In addition, there will be performances by Luis Niño ‘Totó’ (juggler), Martina Covone (aerial rope), company Nom Provisional (Chinese hanger) and Léa Legrand (balance ball). All the circus artists participating in this show directed by Xavier Erra were nominated or awarded at the last edition of the Zirkòlika Awards.

The awards are produced by the organization Zirkòlika , a project for the dissemination and communication of circus arts that has been published since 2004 as the only magazine specializing in circus in the whole of Spain and also maintains a portal of information on the Internet. The awards, which have the cooperation of the Government of Catalonia , the Barcelona City Council and Barcelona Provincial Council , was founded in 2010 to support the creation and recognition of the work of artists and companies Catalan circus.

Tune in here on Wednesday Evening 12/23/2020

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Roc Roc-It, the Clown Prince of Berlin

Roc Roc-It makes carny gold out of everyday objects. Grinning like a roly-poly overgrown tattooed child, he ambles onstage declaring, “This is the most dangerous stunt ever!” Then he reaches into a black drawstring bag and pulls out an ordinary disposable latex glove.

Making a big hoopla over stretching the glove out, he finally manages to distend the cuff over the top half of his face. Then he proceeds to huff and puff, inflating the glove on his head until it resembles a bloated coxcomb or a balloon mohawk. The audience laughs at the ridiculous sight of a potbellied man wearing a blown up glove on his head, but as the glove gets larger and larger, the laughter turns to cringes and cries of protest. Roc-It jacks up the mounting anticipation with goofy pratfalls and sideshow banter until the glove finally bursts all over his face.

With ingeniously simple acts like these, Roc-It has earned the monicker Clown Prince of Berlin. He has indeed lived in Berlin for about ten years – in a caravan outside a squat in an industrial part of Kreuzberg – but Roc-It was actually born in a small town near the Black Forest. “I’m a country boy,” he says with a wide smile that reveals several missing teeth. After several failed apprenticeships, he finally found his calling on a trip to Barcelona. “I saw all these street performers working on the Rambla,” he recalled, “and I was like, yeah, wow, that’s what I want to do.”

Sleeping on the beach and practicing everyday, he built up skills in Diabolo and fire. He learned to hammer a nail up his nose and juggle balls. Then after five years performing throughout Europe, he found himself in New Orleans breaking up with an ex-girlfriend. “I had two weeks left on my visa,” he said, “and I thought, fuck it, I’m going to go and visit some friends in New York.”

It was on his very last day in New York that he made a fateful visit to Coney Island with no other desire than to do a final show on the beach. “I knew nothing about what a sideshow is,” he said, “My friends were jugglers, guys riding a toy unicycle, doing all this classical stuff, and my show was always a bit weirder. And I was always a bit weirder character. So for me, it was basically, like, okay, there’s the main show and I’m the sideshow.”

With that in mind, he put his kit an old green suitcase and painted the words CIRCUS SIDESHOW on it. He was carrying the suitcase when he strolled past Coney Island Circus Sideshow and caught the attention of impresario Dick Zigun, who invited him to perform. Roc-It was a hit and stayed on for the next three years. “They fired the midget,” he laughs.

“While I was in New York, I did a thousand shows a year,” he estimates, but his visa had run out and living illegally finally wore him down. “I was working so much and so intensively, I got injured quite a lot,” he remembers, “I knocked my teeth out. I broke several ribs on stage. I burned my face off. And at one point, it just got to be like, it’s too much.”

Since returning to Europe six years ago, he continues to wow crowds in burlesque shows and street festivals. Twice a year, he performs with Kabaret Kalashnikov, a variety show with an Eastern European storyline. On summer nights, you can find him in the middle of a circle of people at Alexanderplatz during Berlin Lacht Fest. He also regularly performs with the Squidling Brothers Circus Sideshow when they are in Europe.


“Dazzle them with brilliance or baffle them with bullshit,” he declares, rolling up his sleeve to display a motto tattooed on his arm, “Either it has to be really poetic or just so ridiculous, that it’s just as good.”

Roc Roc-it at Baum Haus Comedy Open Air 
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