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Party Peculiar Works Project Performing Arts Vaudevisuals Interview

Vaudevisuals interview with Ralph Lewis – ‘Afterparty: The Rothko Studio”

Peculiar Works Project co-founder Ralph Lewis sat down with me at the Mark Rothko studio and talked about the upcoming site-specific performance titled:  AFTERPARTY: THE ROTHKO STUDIO.

2 Tours Nightly: 
Thursday – Saturday at 7:00pm and 8:30pm; 
Sunday at 5:00pm and 6:30pm

AFTERPARTY: The Rothko Studio is a site-specific, promenade performance in and around the former studio of legendary painter Mark Rothko. Built in 1884 for the YMCA as the Young Men’s Institute, 222 Bowery is best known for the many now-famous artists who lived, worked, and played in this landmarked gem. The building’s former gymnasium is where Rothko created the infamous “Seagram Murals” commissioned by The Four Seasons restaurant in 1957. AFTERPARTY explores this pivotal moment for downtown artists and offers a rare opportunity to visit this historic studio space.

Cast: TOBY BILLOWITZ, GLEN FEINSTEIN, AIDAN FELDMAN, JASON HOWARD*, IRINA KAPLAN, NATHAN KEILLER, CAITI LATTIMER, CATHERINE PORTER*, ISABELLA SCHILLER, DESPINA STAMOS, JENNA ZHU

Director: RALPH LEWIS
Choreographer: RACHEL COHEN
Composer: MARIA DESSENA
Adapter: BARRY ROWELL
Dramaturg: BARBARA YOSHIDA
Story: S.M. DALE
Concept: KIM DEPOLE, CATHERINE PORTER
Lighting Design: DAVID CASTANEDA
Projection Designer: JANE PARISI
Costume Designer: GRACE MARTIN
Production Stage Manager: HEATHER OLMSTEAD
Assistant Stage Manager: ELLIOTT KARLINER
Press Rep: ANDREA ALTON PR
Creative Consultant: BARBARA PITTS McADAMS
Producers: RALPH LEWIS, CATHERINE PORTER, BARRY ROWELL

All performances at 222 Bowery, New York, NY

For More Information/Tickets go here!

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Video Women

Tallulah Bankhead–Trip to the Automat, 1957 TV

Tallulah Brockman Bankhead (January 31, 1902 – December 12, 1968) was an American actress of the stage and screen. Bankhead was known for her husky voice, outrageous personality, and devastating wit. Originating some of the 20th-century theater’s preeminent roles in comedy and melodrama, she gained acclaim as an actress on both sides of the Atlantic. Bankhead became an icon of the tempestuous, flamboyant actress, and her unique voice and mannerisms are often subject to imitation and parody.

Tallulah hailed from the Brockman Bankheads, a prominent Alabama political family — her grandfather and uncle were U.S. Senators and her father served as an eleven-term member of Congress, the final two as Speaker of the House of Representatives. Tallulah’s support of liberal causes such as civil rights broke with the tendency of the Southern Democrats to support a more typically aligned agenda and she often opposed her own family publicly.

Primarily an actress of the stage, Bankhead did have one hit on film (Alfred Hitchcock‘s Lifeboat), as well as a brief but successful career on radio. She later made appearances on television, some of which have become classics.

In her personal life, Bankhead struggled with alcoholism and drug addiction and was infamous for her uninhibited sex life. Bankhead was capable of great kindness and generosity to those in need, supporting disadvantaged foster children and helping several families escape the Spanish Civil War and World War II. Bankhead was inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame in 1972, and the Alabama Women’s Hall of Fame in 1981. Upon her death, Bankhead was credited with nearly 300 films, stage, television, and radio roles. She is regarded as one of the 20th-century theatre’s great Leading Ladies.

Categories
Clown Comedy Mask Performing Arts Photography Physical Theater

IN/SIGHTS – Carlo Mazzone Clementi – Commedia

Carlo Mazzone Clementi

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From Wikipedia.

Carlo Mazzone-Clementi (12 December 1920 – 5 November 2000) was a performer and founder of two schools of commedia, mime and physical theater as well as a contemporary and colleague of leaders of modern European theater. From his arrival in the USA in 1957, he was largely responsible for the spreading of commedia dell’arte in North America.

He first gained attention in Italy in 1947 alongside Marcel Marceau in the mime’s first tour outside of Paris. From 1948 to 1951, he assisted Jacques Lecoq, while Lecoq taught and directed the Players of Padua University. In 1954, Mazzone-Clementi was at Piccolo Teatro di Milano with Dario Fo and Franca Rame.[1]

While he was performing with Piccolo Teatro as well as teaching in Rome, the American theatre scholar and director Eric Bentley came to Italy to direct the Padua Players company in the first Italian production of Bertolt Brecht. Then, with Bentley’s patronage, Mazzone-Clementi toured the United States in 1958, conducting workshops in mime and commedia, and introducing the leather masks of Amleto Sartori to this country. That led to a teaching assignment at theCarnegie Institute of Technology, followed by Brandeis University, the University of California at Berkeley, the American Conservatory Theater and others.[2] He was known as Carlo Mazzone until 1965 when he worked with the new acting ensemble at the Theatre of Lincoln Center. From then on he was known as Carlo Mazzone-Clementi. Clementi was the name of his mother and his grandfather, Girolamo Clementi, who was versed in the work of Paduan playwright and forerunner of commedia dell’arte, Angelo Beolco, known as “Ruzzante.”

In 1972, Mazzone-Clementi and his wife Jane Hill, a graduate of Carnegie-Mellon, went to Humboldt County, California to conduct summer workshops at their rural property. From this experience came the decision to re-locate permanently in Humboldt and to establish a full-time actor training program. In 1974, the couple purchased the Oddfellows Hall in Blue Lake, California and co-founded the Dell’Arte School of Mime and Comedy, now known as theDell’Arte International School of Physical Theatre. Hill also joined the faculty at College of the Redwoods, where the pair created the Grand Comedy Festival at Qual-a-wa-loo, a summer repertory festival that produced plays of Shakespeare in rotation with musical adaptations of those plays; Mazzone-Clementi served as the festival’s artistic director for six years.[3] In 1974 their article, “Commedia and the Actor” was published in The Drama Review TDR (journal).

Mazzone-Clementi moved to Copenhagen, Denmark in 1984 and founded a second sister theater school there, named the Commedia School.[4] In 1994 returned to California and continued teaching until shortly before his death on 5 November 2000 in San Francisco.

I will post another ‘special’ edition on Carlo (with additional photographs taken in the studio)  in 2017 with interviews with Hovey Burgess, Stanley Allan Sherman and a few others who knew him well.

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