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Check out Vaudevisuals – Review – September 2016

Vaudevisuals Year in ReviewVaudevisuals Year in Review – September 2016

September is always a great month for theater and variety arts. This month I interviewed ‘Collapsing Horse Theater‘ from Dublin, funny man Joel Jeske and magic man Nelson Lugo, teacher/performer Carlos Garcia Estevez, Josh Aviner, Lyndsay Magid, and puppet master Kevin Augustine. A special tribute to performance artist and poet/writer Frank Maya, and the Clown Cabaret at 2016 Clown Theater Festival as well as photographs I took of legendary modern dancer Phoebe Neville. A full length version of Rod Serling‘s “Requiem for a Heavyweight” from it’s original ‘Playhouse 90‘ broadcast in  1956.

VAUDEVISUALS INTERVIEW WITH JOSH AVINER AND LYNDSAY MAGID

FRANK MAYA – A TRIBUTE – VIDEO/ESSAY/POSTCARDS/INTERVIEWS

VAUDEDEVISUALS INTERVIEW WITH COLLAPSING HORSE THEATER – DUBLIN

VAUDEVISUALS INTERVIEW WITH JOEL JESKE AND NELSON LUGO – “CIRCUS SALON”

2016 NY CLOWN THEATER FESTIVAL – “CLOWN CABARET” – SEPT 8, 2016

VAUDEVISUALS INTERVIEW WITH CARLOS GARCIA ESTEVEZ – ‘MANIFESTO POETICO’

DANCE PHOTOGRAPHS OF PHOEBE NEVILLE

‘REQUIEM FOR A HEAVYWEIGHT’ – PLAYHOUSE 90 – LIVE TV – 1956

PUPPET SERIES 55 @LAMAMAETC _ SEPT 24TH – NOV 6TH, 2016

VAUDEVISUALS INTERVIEW WITH KEVIN AUGUSTINE – “THE GOD PROJEKT”

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Cinema Film Television Video Writer

‘Requiem for a Heavyweight’ – Playhouse 90 – Live TV – 1956

Take a break from your work today and sit back and experience TV and drama the way it was in 1956. Live TV! 

One of the best television shows ever!

Playhouse 90 - Requiem for a Heavyweight

Requiem for a Heavyweight

Requiem for a Heavyweight was a teleplay written by Rod Serling and produced for the live television show Playhouse 90 on 11 October 1956. Six years later, it was adapted as a 1962 feature film starring Anthony Quinn, Jackie Gleason and Mickey Rooney.

The teleplay won a Peabody Award, the first given to an individual script, and helped establish Serling’s reputation. The broadcast was directed by Ralph Nelsonand is generally considered one of the finest examples of live television drama in the United States, as well as being Serling‘s personal favorite of his own work. Nelson and Serling won Emmy Awards for their work.[1][2]

Jack Palance portrays Harlan “Mountain” McClintock, a once-promising but now washed-up boxer who faces the end of his career after he is savagely defeated by a younger boxer. Keenan Wynn portrays McClintock’s manager Maish; Keenan’s father Ed plays McClintock’s cut man, Army.

McClintock is suffering from Dementia pugilistica or “punch drunk syndrome”—brain damage caused by his career. A fight doctor refuses to certify McClintock for further boxing, saying that another rough match could blind or even kill him. Boxing is all McClintock has ever known, and he’s both terrified of trying something new, and intensely loyal to Maish, who has nurtured him from his youth. Maish has troubles of his own, however: he owes money to the Mafia and tried to raise funds by betting that McClintock would be knocked out early (instead, by gamely and bravely taking a beating and refusing to go down, McClintock cost Maish a fortune).

Kim Hunter portrayed Grace Carney, an employment agency worker who tries to help the boxer make a transition to a new career. Maish persuades the boxer to turn to professional wrestling, though McClintock is proud that he never had a fixed fight and is uncomfortable with the staged, predetermined wrestling match.

Army disapproves of Maish’s plans and refuses to be a part of them. Just before he is scheduled to go into the wrestling ring in a humiliating mountain man costume, McClintock learns of Maish’s betting against him, and parts ways with his manager and mentor. Though he feels that boxing can ruin men’s lives, Maish finds another promising young boxer to train. McClintock takes a chance on working with children at summer camp.

Because Serling and Palance were both experienced boxers, they brought a level of authenticity to Requiem for a Heavyweight, although there was very little boxing depicted in the broadcast. Requiem for a Heavyweight was the beginning of what became one of the new medium’s most successful creative teams, writer Rod Serling and director Ralph Nelson.

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Book Shelf Cinema Comedy Story Teller Television Writer

Vaudevisuals Bookshelf – “Zoomar” by Ernie Kovacs

One of television’s early pioneers. Ernie Kovacs wrote a novel. ZOOMAR in 1957

Published as a hardcover book and then released as a paperback. Here are the covers of both editions.

Ernie Kovacs

Cover of ZOOMAR book with the spine.

img008Inside book description on flap

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Inside back flap with Author’s bio.

Ernie Kovacs

Paperback edition of the book published in 1959 by Bantam.

Ernie KovacsEdie Adams and Ernie Kovacs. A still from the ABC game show “Take a Good Luck” sponsored by Dutch Masters.

Screen Shot 2016-03-11 at 4.11.55 PM

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