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Buster Crabbe in Flash Gordon – 1936 -An Excerpt

FROM WIKIPEDIA:

Flash Gordon is a 1936 science fiction serial. Presented in 13 chapters, it is the first screen adventure for Flash Gordon, the comic-strip character created by Alex Raymond in 1934. It presents the story of Gordon’s visit to the planet Mongo and his encounters with the evil Emperor Ming the MercilessBuster CrabbeJean RogersCharles MiddletonPriscilla Lawson, and Frank Shannon portray the film’s central characters. In 1996, Flash Gordon was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

  1. The Tunnel of Terror – “Aura helps Flash to escape as Zarkov is put to work in Ming’s laboratory and Dale is prepared for her wedding to Ming. Flash meets Prince Thun, leader of the Lion Men, and the pair return to the palace to rescue Dale.

Password: FlashGordon-1936


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Comedy Television Video Writer

Ernie Kovacs Centennial – Panel Discussion – Video excerpts

Description from The Anthology Film Archives Program

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Comedy Film History Performing Arts Television Variety Arts Women

1940 Ads in Playbill

What was it like to live in 1940?

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And Ed Wynn  ‘The Perfect Fool’ was on Broadway with his show “Boys and Girls Together”

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Bouffon Comedy Mime Performing Arts Silent Film Television Variety Arts Vaudeville Video

Ed Wynn on Broadway – “Boys and Girls Together”

Ed Wynn – The Perfect Fool in

BOYS and GIRLS TOGETHER

Presented at The Broadhurst Theatre beginning October 28, 1940.

Ed Wynn (The Perfect Fool) at The Broadhurst Theatre

Inside Program for “Boys and Girls Together”.

Inside Title Page of Program

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Staff listing for Ed Wynn

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Later in his career, Ed Wynn had a TV show “The Ed Wynn Show“. Here is a clip from one of this show that featured Buster Keaton.

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Visit Vaudevisuals.com regularly for more inside Vaudeville/Sideshow/Theater/ and eccentric acts information.

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Amercian Vaudeville Theatre Cinema Clown Comedy Film Marx Brothers Performing Arts Silent Film Television Vaudeville Vaudevisuals Bookshelf

Vaudevisuals Bookshelf – “Chain of Fools”

CHAIN OF FOOLS by Trav S.D.

Chain of Fools traces the art of slapstick comedy from its pre-cinema origins in the ancient pantomime through its silent movie heyday in the teens and twenties, then on to talkies, television, and the Internet. As in his first book, the critically acclaimed No Applause, Just Throw Money: The Book That Made Vaudeville Famous, author Trav S.D. mixes a wicked wit, a scholar’s curiosity, and a keen critical appreciation for laugh-makers through the ages, from classical clowns like Joseph Grimaldi to comedy kings like Mack Sennett, Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd and Buster Keaton . . . to more recent figures, from Red Skelton, Sid Caesar and Ernie Kovacs to Adam Sandler, Jim Carrey and Steve Carell . . . all the way down to the teenagers on YouTube whose backyard antics bring us full circle to slapstick’s beginnings. This valentine to the great clowns contains enough insights and surprises to open the eyes of even life-long comedy fans.

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Silent Film Music Composer Ben Model has this to say about the book!

“I have read a lot of books on silent comedy in film. A lot of them. “Chain of Fools” is not like any of these books, and in a refreshing way. Trav S.D. manages to combine a personal journey through the work of the various luminaries of wordless comedy with the act of also laying them chronologically end-to-end, and manages to do so in an entertaining and humorous way. As he did in his book on Vaudeville, “No Applause, Just Throw Money: the Book that Made Vaudeville Famous”, Trav traces the arc of silent comedy back further than most film historians do in their books, and follows it further into the present as well. “Chain of Fools” is not just about silent comedy itself but its place in our culture and how it’s been a consistent part of it. It’s a fun read, and accessible to both novice and seasoned historian. I thoroughly enjoyed it. (And if you’re not aware of it already, do pick up Trav S.D.’s No Applause–Just Throw Money: The Book That Made Vaudeville Famous)”

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“When I first saw the cover of the book I smiled. This was not Chaplin and Eric Campbell from “Easy Street” or something, it was Author Trav S.D.’s little joke. The principles of the cover were Billy West and Oliver Hardy, THAT introduced me properly to this wonderful book of other film comedians, some famous, some obscure. This is not a reference book, it can be read for pure joy and the author adds his opinions to these characters making them come to life again. You may consider me a fan of Trav from his first book “No Applause Just Throw Money,” for this author brings the same amount of joy and authority to enrich reader’s knowledge of the legacies of the unknown or forgotten. This is pure prose from cover to cover and it could pass for a course study…only this tome is too entertaining for dry lecture. The author has contributed something special in “Chain of Fools,” (Bearmanor Media). This is a five-star rating.” – William Cassara

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Art Book Shelf Clown Comedy Music Performing Arts Photography Recommended Reading List Television Vaudevisuals Bookshelf

Vaudevisuals Bookshelf – “How Sweet It Is” – Jackie Gleason

This is one ‘helluva’ funny book!

 Inside book jacket flaps.

Back Cover of the book.

This book is great! If you like The Honeymooners and any of Jackie Gleason’s TV Specials over the years you will enjoy reading these stories about his wonderful life. There is one that I remember very well. When he stayed at the St. Regis Hotel he frequented the in-house King Cole Bar   and sat next to  Salvador Dali. This drinking companion ended up drawing an album cover for his music album “The Romantic Moods of Jackie Gleason“.

The rest of the book is equally hysterical and so enjoyable!

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Magic Magic Performing Arts Photography Television Variety Arts Video

Legendary Magician – “Cardini”

Magician Cardini

From Feb 1932 Vanity Fair Magazine

 Richard Valentine Pitchford presto change-o! Cardini – who does things to a cigarette that no Indian fakir ever did to a rope – was born in Wales in 1898 and could bewitch a pack of cards before he was old enough to talk. Four years overseas in the War left him shell-shocked, and, after eighteen months in a hospital, he was discharged as disabled. Working his way to Australia on a freighter, he made his debut as a sorcerer in Sydney. Since then, Cardini has prestidigitated in twelve countries and was the first magacian to mystify his King and Queen by Royal Command. His vanishing-cigarette trick involves thirty lighted cigarettes, a cigar and a pipe. One the stage, he remains absolutely mute, shunning the patter of magicians and retaining impressive calm. Of late, he has been gathering laurels in the music halls of Manhattan with his cards, his cigarettes and his billiard balls.

1962 Autographed photograph of Cardini inscribed to Dai Vernon.

Publicity photograph for Cardini

Poster for one of Cardini’s appearances at a Keith theater for the Annual IBM Convention.

Cardini died on Nov 13th. 1973. Here is the NY Times Obit.

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Comedy FringeNYC 2016 Magic Performing Arts Photography Physical Theater Puppetry Television The Tank Variety Arts Women Year in Review

Check out Vaudevisuals – Review – September 2016

Vaudevisuals Year in ReviewVaudevisuals Year in Review – September 2016

September is always a great month for theater and variety arts. This month I interviewed ‘Collapsing Horse Theater‘ from Dublin, funny man Joel Jeske and magic man Nelson Lugo, teacher/performer Carlos Garcia Estevez, Josh Aviner, Lyndsay Magid, and puppet master Kevin Augustine. A special tribute to performance artist and poet/writer Frank Maya, and the Clown Cabaret at 2016 Clown Theater Festival as well as photographs I took of legendary modern dancer Phoebe Neville. A full length version of Rod Serling‘s “Requiem for a Heavyweight” from it’s original ‘Playhouse 90‘ broadcast in  1956.

VAUDEVISUALS INTERVIEW WITH JOSH AVINER AND LYNDSAY MAGID

FRANK MAYA – A TRIBUTE – VIDEO/ESSAY/POSTCARDS/INTERVIEWS

VAUDEDEVISUALS INTERVIEW WITH COLLAPSING HORSE THEATER – DUBLIN

VAUDEVISUALS INTERVIEW WITH JOEL JESKE AND NELSON LUGO – “CIRCUS SALON”

2016 NY CLOWN THEATER FESTIVAL – “CLOWN CABARET” – SEPT 8, 2016

VAUDEVISUALS INTERVIEW WITH CARLOS GARCIA ESTEVEZ – ‘MANIFESTO POETICO’

DANCE PHOTOGRAPHS OF PHOEBE NEVILLE

‘REQUIEM FOR A HEAVYWEIGHT’ – PLAYHOUSE 90 – LIVE TV – 1956

PUPPET SERIES 55 @LAMAMAETC _ SEPT 24TH – NOV 6TH, 2016

VAUDEVISUALS INTERVIEW WITH KEVIN AUGUSTINE – “THE GOD PROJEKT”

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Cinema Film Television Video Writer

‘Requiem for a Heavyweight’ – Playhouse 90 – Live TV – 1956

Take a break from your work today and sit back and experience TV and drama the way it was in 1956. Live TV! 

One of the best television shows ever!

Playhouse 90 - Requiem for a Heavyweight

Requiem for a Heavyweight

Requiem for a Heavyweight was a teleplay written by Rod Serling and produced for the live television show Playhouse 90 on 11 October 1956. Six years later, it was adapted as a 1962 feature film starring Anthony Quinn, Jackie Gleason and Mickey Rooney.

The teleplay won a Peabody Award, the first given to an individual script, and helped establish Serling’s reputation. The broadcast was directed by Ralph Nelsonand is generally considered one of the finest examples of live television drama in the United States, as well as being Serling‘s personal favorite of his own work. Nelson and Serling won Emmy Awards for their work.[1][2]

Jack Palance portrays Harlan “Mountain” McClintock, a once-promising but now washed-up boxer who faces the end of his career after he is savagely defeated by a younger boxer. Keenan Wynn portrays McClintock’s manager Maish; Keenan’s father Ed plays McClintock’s cut man, Army.

McClintock is suffering from Dementia pugilistica or “punch drunk syndrome”—brain damage caused by his career. A fight doctor refuses to certify McClintock for further boxing, saying that another rough match could blind or even kill him. Boxing is all McClintock has ever known, and he’s both terrified of trying something new, and intensely loyal to Maish, who has nurtured him from his youth. Maish has troubles of his own, however: he owes money to the Mafia and tried to raise funds by betting that McClintock would be knocked out early (instead, by gamely and bravely taking a beating and refusing to go down, McClintock cost Maish a fortune).

Kim Hunter portrayed Grace Carney, an employment agency worker who tries to help the boxer make a transition to a new career. Maish persuades the boxer to turn to professional wrestling, though McClintock is proud that he never had a fixed fight and is uncomfortable with the staged, predetermined wrestling match.

Army disapproves of Maish’s plans and refuses to be a part of them. Just before he is scheduled to go into the wrestling ring in a humiliating mountain man costume, McClintock learns of Maish’s betting against him, and parts ways with his manager and mentor. Though he feels that boxing can ruin men’s lives, Maish finds another promising young boxer to train. McClintock takes a chance on working with children at summer camp.

Because Serling and Palance were both experienced boxers, they brought a level of authenticity to Requiem for a Heavyweight, although there was very little boxing depicted in the broadcast. Requiem for a Heavyweight was the beginning of what became one of the new medium’s most successful creative teams, writer Rod Serling and director Ralph Nelson.

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Comedy Dixon Place LaMaMa etc Music Performing Arts Photography PS122 Story Teller Television The Kitchen Vaudevisuals Interview Video Writer

Frank Maya – A Tribute – Video/Essay/Postcards/Interviews

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FRANK MAYA

Frank Maya: Out There By Victoria Linchong

Frank Maya once said that he turned to comedy “as a way to make the world safe for me.” The first openly gay comedian to appear on MTV and all three major television networks, Maya’s candor and wit helped pave the way for greater acceptance of homosexuality in mainstream media. As ABC News noted in a 1993 introduction to Maya, “Until recently, comics who wanted to succeed in show business never ever admitted they were gay. And they certainly never used their homosexuality as a punchline.”

Maya was born in 1950 to a middle-class Catholic family in Long Island. His Irish and Colombian background later became fodder for much of his comic material. A gifted musician and vocalist, he found work playing in cabarets and folk clubs after graduating from Hofstra University. In the mid-1970s, he met director John Jesurun and began venturing into the alternative music scene, then dominated by the Talking Heads and post-punk New Wave.

Fronting a band called the Decals, Maya became known for satirical songs that combined Latin-infused pop with absurdist poetic patter. Several of his songs also used toy instruments, recorded sound, or found objects such as scissors or a jar full of pennies. In one song, the refrain consisted of Maya shouting, “Pancakes!” with a recorded voice responding, “They’re ready!” Impish and whimsical as his songs were, they also were biting commentaries on consumerism and the banality of everyday life. His lyrics also revealed a quirky way with rhymes, “When you’re home for the holidays do you realize your dog looks upset? Does he realize during dinner, he’s simply the household pet?” The New York Times praised him as “a wacky pop iconoclast with enough star quality to have earned comparisons to performers as dissimilar as Laurie Anderson, David Byrne and Peter Allen.”

Maya was part of Jesurun’s legendary serial theater piece, Chang in a Void Moon, when it premiered at the Pyramid Club in 1982. His music performances had always verged on theater with interludes of acerbic monologues he called rants. In the mid- 1980s, he began focusing more on his rants, joining a growing cadre of solo performers such as Spalding Gray, Eric Bogosian, and Karen Finley, who were similarly examining American society through a personal lens.Pacing around the stage, he tackled pop culture, gender issues, and the mundanity of existence. Thirty years before the current outcry over the lack of minorities in mainstream media, Maya was commenting, “There’re a few movies like Cotton Club where they take all the black actors who’ve been out of work for ten years and put them in the same film… People say, ‘See we’re making progress.” His three-hour-long solo performances were performed at P.S. 122, La Mama, Dixon Place, the Kitchen, and Lincoln Center’s Serious Fun series. He also toured the mid-Atlantic states and performed in Germany.

During that time, Maya was known to paint his ears gold, perhaps to distinguish himself from other solo artists. He soon found a much more authentic way of differentiating himself. While Maya had made a few allusions to his sexual orientation in his music and his rants, he had never been completely overt about his homosexuality. His former partner Neil Greenberg believes that an anti-gay incident may have radicalized him. Whatever the cause, Maya began boldly declaring his homosexuality in 1989. At the same time, Maya was also realizing that he could achieve wider public attention by rebranding himself as a stand-up comic. “In New York they call me a performance artist…” he remarked in a 1989 Washington Post article, “But if you ask the Washington audience after my show, they’ll say, ‘He’s a stand-up comic.’ I always feel that my stuff is misinterpreted — it’s very funny, but it’s got serious points in it… But I’m not afraid of being considered a comedian as long as people like Lily Tomlin are considered comedians.”

Maya made his first openly gay appearance on HA! Comedy Network in 1990. His breakthrough to mainstream media happened at a pivotal time when the AIDS crisis was at its peak. Maya’s self-deprecating humor was a refreshing antidote to the widespread alarm in both the general population and the gay community. Here was a good-looking man without any effeminate traits, talking simply and naturally about being homosexual. “Comedy is about really being truthful,” he stated, “People are hoping the comic will tell them everything. So how can you hide your love life? It just seems impossible.” Though he joked about people in his audience who looked mortified, he said he rarely had hecklers and added, “”I guess people are still recovering from the fact that they can’t believe what I’m saying.”

Throughout the early 1990s, Maya appeared regularly at Caroline’s Comedy Club and MTV’s “Half-Hour Comedy Hour.” He also starred in his own half-hour special on Comedy Central. His last show Paying for the Pool ran at the Atlantic Theater for eight weeks. It was described as, “A one-man show in which Maya talks about his childhood and coming-out experiences.”

Maya was diagnosed with AIDs in 1995 but continued to perform. In The Queerest Art: Essays on Lesbian and Gay Theater, Carmelita Tropicana remembers him at a conference for the Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies (CLAGS) four months before he died. Despite a high fever, he did his entire set and had to be persuaded to go home early. Although friends were tearful over his impending death, Tropicana recalls, “[Frank] hated the tender sweet image of white helium balloons flying up to the sky in memory of those who have died of AIDS. He was angry, he wanted something loud, an uzi, a bomb to explode.” An upfront iconoclast to the end, Frank Maya was 45 years old when he died.

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Screen Shot 2016-09-06 at 9.47.12 PM1986 Postcard for Frank’s performance at CBGB

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Screen Shot 2016-09-06 at 9.49.45 PM1986 Postcard for Franks Maya’s performance at LaMama Cabaret

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Frank Maya at The Kitchen1990 Postcard for Frank Maya’s performance at The Kitchen.

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Frank Maya’s Music

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FRANK MAYA ACCORDING TO HIS FRIENDS: Uncut, Unexpurgated, Unabridged

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Postcard for Franks Maya’s performance at PS122 – 1989

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Frank Maya - Paying for the Pool 1993

Postcard for performance at Atlantic Theater – “Paying for the Pool” 1993

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MORE ABOUT FRANK MAYA – Performance Videos

Frank Maya at Dixon Place (circa 12-31-91)

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REFERENCES

Brown, Joe. “A Little Tattle Tale” Washington Post; 17 March 1989.

Holden Stephen. “A Wacky Pop Iconoclast” New York Times; 15 July 1983.

Holden, Stephen. “Frank Maya, 45, Performance Artist and Solo Comic.” New York Times; 10 Aug 1995.

Holden, Stephen. “Music Noted in Brief: Frank Maya, Singer, Satirizes Consumerism.” New York Times; 30 March 1983.

Rizzo, Frank. “Maya’s Punch Line Reaches a Broader Audience.” Hartford Courant, 22 Sept 1993.

Solomon, Alisa, and Framji Minwalla. The Queerest Art: Essays on Lesbian and Gay Theater. New York: New York UP, 2002.

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Thanks to Neil Greenberg,(postcards, videos,interview) Ellie Covan,(interview, video) John Jesurun (interview) and Victoria Linchong (Writer/Profile) for their great contribution to this post!