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Jazz Music Pangea Performing Arts Street Performing Variety Arts Women

Eccentric Mr. Matt Roper & Miss Muffy Styler @Pangea 10/23 ~ 7pm

Seating is strictly limited. Pangea has about 20 seats outdoors, so table reservations are necessary.

We would strongly suggest calling (212) 995-0900 to book.

A suggested donation of $15 would be warmly welcomed to support the artists and Pangea.

Everyone is welcome. Pangea is following Covid19 guidelines!

Remember to wrap up warmly for these cooler fall evenings… . 


Pangea has been supporting and providing a platform for artists of all persuasions since the 1980s. Pangea is an out-and-out East Village staple and in these urgent times they, and NYC, need your support more than ever! Plus, the staff are the best and the hospitality is legendary.

Since the Pandemic, many favorite restaurants that are very supportive of the performing arts have been having financial troubles.

No restaurant patrons = Financial Trouble!

So in light of this situation, I am asking anyone to contribute to the GoFundMe campaign for PANGEA!

go HERE for More information

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Categories
Interview Jazz Music Roulette Vaudevisuals Interview Video

Vaudevisuals interview with Patricia Nicholson – Vision Festival

Vision Festival – Jazz for a Free World

“Disciplined disregard for traditional boundaries”

OK. Here is the direct link to tickets. VISION FESTIVAL

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Categories
Dixon Place Jazz Performing Arts Tap Dance

Hank Smith – “The Story of Tap” at Dixon Place

Saturday, April 8th @7:30 pm

THE STORY OF TAP…etc.

“The Story of Tap…Etc.” is a continuation of a series originally done at Dixon Place for six evenings in 1998 and 2005. It returned for one night in 2015 and comes back again for another night. It is a narrative of tap dance, rather than some definitive history of it. Hank Smith will engage in conversation with performers about tap and associated art forms. Film clips will be shown and the performers will cover different perspectives of experience by telling their stories through words, movement and music. It’s all an improvisation. The story keeps going…

Guests Mickey Davidson, Bernice Brooks and Frank Owens

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ABOUT THE ARTISTS

Hank Smith has done mime, clowning, dance, photography, video and television production. For twenty years he was a Stage Manager on Sesame Street, also functioning as Associate Director, Actor and Choreographer. As a tap dancer and educator, he has participated in the NY Committee to Celebrate National Tap Dance Day’s Tap Extravaganza, the Tradition In Tap Experiences, NY Tap City and NJ Tap Festival. His performance work has also been presented in and around the NYC area. A retired Associate Professor Emeritus at Bloomfield College, New Jersey, he has two blogs and is writing a book about his creative journey.

Mickey Davidson, dancer, teacher, choreographer has worked with Sounds in Motion Dance Company, Norma Miller’s Lindy Hoppers, Frankie Manning, Charles “Cookie” Cook, Buster Brown, Harriet ”Quicksand” Brown, Savoy Swingers, Roots of Brazil, Cecil Taylor, Sun Ra, Ahmed Abdullah, Oliver Lake and Ntozake Shange, among others. She is primary choreographer for her company, MICKEY D. & FRIENDS, a group of dancers and musicians exploring the relationship between music and dance. She does numerous residencies for schools, community centers along with staff development workshops. Ms. Davidson taught Jazz Dance and Tap as Artist-in-Residence at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut for seventeen years.

Bernice Brooks has been a professional drummer for over forty years. She has toured nationally and internationally playing jazz, gospel, and blues rhythms, working with Tito Puente, Patti LaBelle and Gregory Hines. She is active in the tap community, drumming for NY Tap City and the NY Committee to Celebrate National Tap Dance Day’s Tap Extravaganza, where she received a Flo-Bert Award in 2015. She is an educator/artist-in-residence in the tri-state area teaching buckets, samba, reggae, traditional drumming and video production. She has a passion for music, working in every genre, her secret to success in a male-dominated industry.

Frank Owens has a vast musical background. He has been the musical director for Johnny Mathis, Chubby Checker, Melba Moore, Johnny Nash, Connie Frances, John Denver, Freda Payne, Ruth Brown, Petula Clark and Lena Horne, to name a few. He was conductor and pianist for the Broadway production of “Ain’t Misbehavin’” and Maurice Hines’ “Uptown It’s Hot” and was also musical director for the first David Letterman Show in 1980, airing mornings on NBC-TV. He is the musical director for the annual NY Committee to Celebrate National Tap Dance Day’s Tap Extravaganza and hosts a weekly open mic run by Cobi Narita.

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General Admission

$15 in advance

$18 at the door

Stu./Sen./idNYC

$12

~TICKETS HERE~

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Categories
Jazz Music Video Waterfront Barge Museum Women

“The Brooklyn Blowhards” – a Jazz ensemble @Waterfront Barge Museum

Waterfront Barge MuseumWaterfront Barge Museum located in Red Hook, Brooklyn.

A great night of music was had this past weekend at the historic Waterfront Barge Museum in Red Hook, Brooklyn.

The vibrant and overwhelmingly talented jazz ensemble “The Brooklyn Blowhards” performed.

The Brooklyn Blowhards

Jeff Lederer/Yuma Uesaka – tenor saxophones

Steven Bernstein – trumpet/slide trumpet
Joe Fiedler – trombone
Stephen LaRosa/Allison Miller – percussion
Art Bailey – accordian
Gary Lucas – National Steel Guitar
Mary LaRose – vocals
2016.07.23.BBlowhards_151Jeff Lederer/Yuma Uesaka – tenor saxophones
The group performed a tribute to Albert Ayler and also nautical songs inspired by Moby Dick and other sea-related songs.

 Also coming up at the Waterfront Barge Museum are ‘Nanne & Ankie – Dutch Folksingers on August 13 at 2pm and 4pm. FREE
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Categories
Burlesque Cabaret Dance Dixon Place Jazz Music Performing Arts Photography Video Women

Mad Jenny and the Society Band’s ‘Love Und Greed’

Mad Jenny and the Society Band’s ‘Love Und Greed’

Presented at Dixon Place on January 13, 2016

2016.01.13_JennyL.007Jenny Lee Mitchell performs her show “Mad Jenny” at Dixon Place. 

2016.01.13_JennyL.248Jenny Lee removes half her clothes to reveal the other half of her personality.

2016.01.13_JennyL.033From the depths of the Berlin cabaret scene in Germany comes the show “Mad Jenny”.

2016.01.13_JennyL.169Andrianna Smela added the ‘soprano’ voice to the evening’s mood.

2016.01.13_JennyL.192Marry Isenberg (Bass) and Ric Becker (Trombone) added the right amount of instrumental music.

2016.01.13_JennyL.040Pandora (Anita Berber) enticed the audience with her exotic dance.

2016.01.13_JennyL.086The women of ‘Desert Sin’ added a very surreal comic touch to the show.

2016.01.13_JennyL.348Maria Dessena with the accordion added musical talent to the evening’s songs.

2016.01.13_JennyL.291With paper in hand she leaves the audience with one last romantic song.

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Mad Jenny and the Society Band’s Love und Greed.

Cast & Creatives

Jenny Lee Mitchell (concept, translations, vocals & clarinet)

Maria Dessena (arrangements, piano & accordion)

Patrice Miller (staging & choreography)

Pandora (Anita Berber)

Djahari Clark (artistic director)

Desert Sin

Andrianna Smela (soprano)

Ric Baker (trombone)

Marry Isenberg (Bass)

David Palmer (lighting & projection design)

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Two wonderful reviews of the show!

One by Jed Ryan here.

And One by Laura Vogels here.

Categories
Art Book Shelf Jazz Music Photography

The Vaudevisuals Bookshelf – “Rebirth of the Cool.”

Screen Shot 2016-01-18 at 3.02.21 PM

Rebirth of the Cool –

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A visionary of the Greenwich Village nightlife scene in the 1950s and 60s, photographer Robert James Campbell vigorously documented New York’s jazz era, and its metamorphosis into the beat and folk movements. Despite Campbell’s artistic prowess–evident in his arresting images of the people who would shape the American cultural landscape for generations to come–Campbell died alone in a homeless shelter in Burlington, Vermont in 2002. His identity, and former life as an esteemed photojournalist for The Village Voice and Downbeat Magazine, would only be revealed by the unlikely discovery by a young college graduate of his ephemera and personal belongings within a trove of cardboard boxes.


Rebirth of the Cool
is the story of Robert James Campbell as reconstructed by Jessica Ferber, and born from tragedy; Campbell, once a wildly talented artist, but wrought by mental demons, financial hardship, and health failure, had to give up his passionate work at what should have been the prime years of his career, having succumbed to his deteriorating body and mind. Campbell left New York for LA and then disappeared into New England with little hope, but resolute to keep and care for his art he managed to diligently transport his negatives and images with him throughout his turbulent life, and ultimately with him into homelessness.

At the height of his photographic career Campbell captured the likes of John Coltrane, The Modern Jazz Quartet, Philly Joe Jones, Count Basie, Bud Powell, Richie Havens, Chuck Berry, and more. Shot onstage and off, the intimacy of the photos is moving and prescient. Rebirth of the Cool collects the best of Campbell’s work, shot at legendary clubs like Birdland, The Village Vanguard, and The Gaslight Café, as well as street photography, international work from his time spent in Germany, and tour photography. The era in which Campbell photographed was brief and precious, and the content he left behind represents a time capsule–a rebirth and regeneration–of a moment that was flashpoint for the culture and heritage of New York, and the nation as a whole.

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Categories
Jazz Music Performing Arts Photography PS122 Vaudevisuals Interview Video

Vaudevisuals interview with Frank Boyd – “The Holler Sessions” – Coil Festival 2016

THE HOLLER SESSIONS

“But when Ray sits back and lets the music wash over him, there’s dignity in his awe-struck stillness. His raptness makes us want to hear through his ears. And when the theater fades to black, as it does intermittently throughout the show, and we sit in the darkness with the music, sound becomes tactile, and even pop-station babies and longhairs are likely to feel like true believers in the gospel of Ray.”

Ben Brantley, NYTimes Jan 11, 2016

For more information/tickets go here!